U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployment History

FWFDs from 2000 to Present

Part 7 - 2010 FWFDs

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw - 24 April 1980

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 1980)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployment History

FWFDs from 2000 to Present

Part 1 - 2000 FWFDs

Part 2 - 2001 to 2002 FWFDs

Part 3 - 2003 to 2004 FWFDs

Part 4 - 2005 to 2006 FWFDs

Part 5 - 2007 to 2008 FWFDs

Part 6 - 2009 FWFDs

Part 7 - 2010 FWFDs

Part 8 - 2011 FWFDs

Part 9 - 2012 to 2013 FWFDs

Part 10 - 2014 to 2015 FWFDs

Part 11 - 2016 to 2017 FWFDs

Part 12 - 2018 to 2019 FWFDs

Part 13 - 2020 to 2021 FWFDs

Part 14 - 2022 to 2023 FWFDs

 

War in Iraq will be called 'Operation New Dawn' to reflect reduced U.S. role

The Obama administration has decided to give the war in Iraq a new name -- "Operation New Dawn" -- to reflect the reduced role U.S. troops will play in securing the country this year as troop levels fall, according to a memo from Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates. Since U.S. forces charged across the Kuwaiti border toward Baghdad in 2003, the war has been known as Operation Iraqi Freedom. The new name is scheduled to take effect in September, when U.S. troop levels are supposed to drop to about 50,000. The change is intended to send a message that the U.S. military's combat role in Iraq is rapidly drawing to a close. In the Feb. 17 memo, Gates wrote to Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top commander for the region, that the name change seeks to "recognize our evolving relationship with the Government of Iraq." Such name changes are not unusual. The name of the 1991 Persian Gulf War changed as the mission changed, from Operation Desert Shield to Operation Desert Storm and then finally to Operation Southern Watch and Operation Northern Watch. The name change for the current conflict was first reported by ABC News, which posted the memo on its Web site. A Pentagon spokesman confirmed the decision (Ref. By Greg Jaffe - Friday, February 19, 2010, Associated Press).

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/18/AR2010021805888.html

 

Aircraft Carriers have operated in Seas and Oceans to include the bodies of water in the AtlanticMediterranean Sea, Red Sea, Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf (Arabian Gulf North Arabian Sea), Indian Ocean, Eastern and Western Pacific Oceans, while both east and west coast deployments often operated under the direction of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command and US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet,  participating in Maritime Security Operations (MSO), Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein continues, beginning on 20 March 2003 to 2011, with the firing of Tomahawk missiles from U.S. ships in the Arabian Gulf and Red Sea, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, moving ashore in Bahrain in 1993, while their former head quarters, USS LA SALLE departed for overhaul and reassignment, and the 5th Fleet, reactivated with operational control of the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992, (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait).

  

Beginning in December 1995, US and allied nations deployed peacekeeping forces to Bosnia in support of Operation Joint Endeavor. Task Force Eagle, comprised of 20,000 American soldiers, is implementing the military elements of the Dayton Peace Accords in support of Operation Joint Endeavor. This operation marked the first commitment of forces in NATO's history as well as the first time since World War II that American and Russian soldiers have shared a common mission. Today, thousands of people are alive in Bosnia because of these soldiers' service.

 

In the first three months of Operation Joint Endeavor operations, Air Force mobility forces flew 3,000 missions, carried over 15,600 troops and delivered more than 30,100 short tons of cargo. These statistics reflect the presence of the C-17, which was systematically employed in a major contingency for the first time. The limited airfield at Tuzla, was the major port of debarkation in Bosnia-Herzegovina. During the first critical month of operations, the C-17 flew slightly more than 20 percent of the missions into Tuzla but delivered over 50 percent of the cargo (Ref. 456).

 

War in Iraq will be called 'Operation New Dawn' to reflect reduced U.S. role

 

The Obama administration has decided to give the war in Iraq a new name -- "Operation New Dawn" -- to reflect the reduced role U.S. troops will play in securing the country this year as troop levels fall, according to a memo from Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates. Since U.S. forces charged across the Kuwaiti border toward Baghdad in 2003, the war has been known as Operation Iraqi Freedom. The new name is scheduled to take effect in September, when U.S. troop levels are supposed to drop to about 50,000. The change is intended to send a message that the U.S. military's combat role in Iraq is rapidly drawing to a close. In the Feb. 17 memo, Gates wrote to Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top commander for the region, that the name change seeks to "recognize our evolving relationship with the Government of Iraq." Such name changes are not unusual. The name of the 1991 Persian Gulf War changed as the mission changed, from Operation Desert Shield to Operation Desert Storm and then finally to Operation Southern Watch and Operation Northern Watch. The name change for the current conflict was first reported by ABC News, which posted the memo on its Web site. A Pentagon spokesman confirmed the decision (Ref. By Greg Jaffe - Friday, February 19, 2010, Associated Press).

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/18/AR2010021805888.html

 

As a forward deployed carrier, aircraft carrier deployments during the seasons of each year referred to as Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter underway periods while in some cases refereed to as a WestPac or Arabian/Persian Gulf deployments, which become Foreign Water fleet deployments when the carrier visits foreign ports or operate for extended periods out side waters of Japan for a month or longer.

 

2010 EAST and WEST COAST DEPLOYMENTS - Includes Florida

 

2010 U.S. Atlantic (Second & Sixth Fleets) U.S. Pacific Fleet (Third and Seventh Fleets) and the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet Aircraft Carrier Deployments Includes Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) Red Sea, Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf (Arabian Gulf), North Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean, Eastern and Western Pacific Oceans, while both east and west coast deployments often operated under the direction of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, participating in Maritime Security Operations (MSO), "Operation New Dawn" -- to reflect the reduced role U.S. troops will play in securing the country, former Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command.

 

The U.S. Navy's 2009 Pacific Fleet and Seventh Fleet Aircraft Carriers deployments and Carriers from both West and East coast, resulted in one CVN extending into 2010 operating under the direction of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command participating in Maritime Security Operations (MSO), "Operation New Dawn" -- to reflect the reduced role U.S. troops will play in securing the country, former Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein continues, beginning on 20 March 2003 with the firing of Tomahawk missiles from U.S. ships in the Arabian Gulf and Red Sea and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command are as follows:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) - 3rd  & 7th

North Arabian Sea

11th  WestPac

South China Sea

Strait of Malacca

4th IO 

 

CVW-11

NK

31 July 2009

26 Mar 2010

Middle East 2nd Iraq & Afghanistan War 239-days

Ships 22nd FWFD

3rd Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and 2nd Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001.

 

Nimitz CSG relieved Ronald Reagan CSG as CTF-50 and launched the first sorties

in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan; relieved by the Eisenhower CSG as CTF-50. CVW-11 flying more than 2,600 combat sorties and 15,296 cumulative flight hours in support of OEF.

 

Ports of call: Yokosuka, Japan; Changi Naval Base, Singapore; Manama, Bahrain; port visit in the Middle East; the island of Phuket, Thailand; Port Klang, Kuala and Bremerton, Wash.

 

Squadrons from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 include the "Black Aces" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 41 (FA-18F); the "Tophatters" of VFA 14 (FA-18E); the "Warhawks" of VFA 97 (FA-18C(N)); the "Sidewinders" of VFA 86 (FA-18C(N)); the "Indians" of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 6 (SH-60F/HH-60H); the "Black Ravens" of Electronic Attack Squadron VAQ-135 (EA-6B); the "Providers" of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 30 (C-2A) and the "Wallbangers" of Carrier Airborne Command and Control Squadron VAW-117 (E-2C Hawkeye 2000 NP). Detachments from the "Easy Riders" of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 37 (HH-60H Seahawks); the "Battle Cats" of HSL 43 (); the "Wolfpack" of HSL 45 (SH-60S LAMPS MK III) and the "Scorpions" of HSL 49 (SH-60B).

 

Nimitz Carrier Strike Group (CSG), Commanded by Rear Adm. John W. Miller, is comprised of USS Nimitz (CVN-68), the guided-missile destroyers USS Pinckney (DDG 91) and USS Sampson (DDG-102) of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 23, the Ticonderoga-class cruiser USS Chosin (CG-55) from Commander, Naval Surface Group, Mid-Pacific and the Perry-class frigate USS Rentz (FFG-46) from DESRON 1. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 11 and USNS Bridge (T-AOE-10) embarking the "Wildcards" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 23 also accompany Nimitz CSG (Ref. Nimitz Strike Group Underway in Support of Maritime Strategy - Story Number: NNS090731-19 - Release Date: 7/31/2009 4:15:00 PM - From USS Nimitz Public Affairs, USS Nimitz, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=47343

Persian Gulf, arm of the Arabian Sea, 90,000 sq mi (233,100 sq km), between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran, extends c.600 mi (970 km) from the Shatt al Arab delta to the Strait of Hormuz, which links it with the Gulf of Oman

  Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources

 

2010 U.S. Atlantic (Second & Sixth Fleets) U.S. Pacific Fleet (Third and Seventh Fleets) and the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet Aircraft Carrier Deployments with east coast carriers participating in Maritime Security Operations (MSO), "Operation New Dawn" -- to reflect the reduced role U.S. troops will play in securing the country, former Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein continues, beginning on 20 March 2003 with the firing of Tomahawk missiles from U.S. ships in the Arabian Gulf and Red Sea and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command are as follows:

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) - U. S. Fleet Forces Command, 6th, 5th, Central Command & 7th (5th North Arabian Sea dep. & 17th voy.)

NorLant

13th Med

15th Suez Canal

3rd OEF

3rd MSO

16th Suez Canal

Med

NorLant

CVW-7

AG

2 Jan 2010

28 Jul 2010

Europe

Middle East

Afghanistan War & Maritime Security Operations

Persian Gulf

20th FWFD

208-days

3rd Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001 on her 3rd Maritime Security Operations (MSO).

 

Ports of call included: Middle East Port; Antalya, Turkey; Naples, Italy and Mayport, FL.

 

Squadrons: VFA-143, Pukin' Dogs, Strike Fighter Squadron, FA-18E; VFA-103, Jolly Rogers, Strike Fighter Squadron, FA-18F; VFA-83, Rampagers, Strike Fighter Squadron, FA-18C(N); VFA-131, Wildcats, Strike Fighter Squadron, FA-18C(N); VAQ-140, Patriots, Tactical Electronic Attack Squadron, EA-6B; VAW-121, Bluetails Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron, E-2C 2000 NP; HS-5, Night Dippers, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron, SH-60F / HH-60H and VRC-40 Det., Rawhide, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron, C-2A.

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) CSG is made up of Commander, CSG 8, Rear Adm. Phil Davidson; the aircraft carrier, homeported in Norfolk, Va.; Carrier Air Wing Seven (CVW) 7; Commander, Destroyer Squadron 28; the guided-missile destroyer USS McFaul (DDG-74), homeported in Norfolk; and the Mayport, Fla.-based ships, guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG-66) and guided-missile destroyers USS Carney (DDG-64) and USS Farragut (DDG-99).

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) - U. S. Fleet Forces Command, & 3rd

Caribbean

SoLant

1st Cape Horn

SoPac

EastPac

CVW-17

AA

12 Jan 2010

12 Apr 2010

West Coast Transit

16th FWFD

91-days

 

Home port transfer from Norfolk, Va. to San Diego, Ca.

Southern Seas 2010 and will head to Haiti, on her home port transfer to the West Coast, stationed at San Diego, Ca. via Cape Horn in support of Operation Unified Response providing Humanitarian Operations in Haiti.

 

The Carl Vinson spearheaded the beginning of Operation Unified Response as its embarked helicopters delivered more than 2,900,000 lbs. of cargo ashore. Arriving on station less than 72 hours after the quake, Carl Vinson immediately rendered assistance. Over two weeks, Vinson and its embarked 19 helicopters flew more than 2,200 sorties, delivering more than 166 tons of food, 89,000 gallons of water and 38,700 lbs. of medical supplies to earthquake victims. Specifically, the ship delivered 1,095,442 lbs of food; 147,591 gallons of water; and more than 40,000 pounds of medical supplies. The ship's medical team treated 60 patients, while the air wing flew 1,299 sorties and conducted 1,152 medical evacuations (Ref. Carrier Strike Group One Conducts Change of Command Ceremony- Story Number: NNS101028-09 - Release Date: 10/28/2010 2:46:00 PM - By Carrier Strike Group One Public Affairs, NORTH ISLAND, Ca (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56857

 

Ports of call: Port-Au-Prince, Haiti; Mayport; Rio de Janerio, Brazil; at the port of Callao, Peru.

 

The squadrons of CVW-17 include VFA-81 (*2), Sunliners (FA-18E); VAW-125 (*2), Tigertails (E-2C Hawkeye 2000 NP); HS-15, Red Lions (SH-60F/HH-60H); HS-7 DET. (*1), Dusty DogS (SH-60F/HH-60H); HS-11 DET. (*1), Dragon Slayers (SH-60F/HH-60H); HSC-9 DET. (*1), Tridents (MH-60S); HM-14 DET. (*1), Vanguard (MH-53E); HM-15 DET. (*1), Blackhawks (MH-53E) and VRC-40 DET.5, Rawhides (C-2A NP).

 

(*1) deployed aboard until Jan. 31 from Jan. 13, 2010 in Support Humanitarian Operations in Haiti and (*2) deployed aboard from Feb. 1, 2010.

 

With the departure of Carl Vinson, Carrier Strike Group Commanded by Rear. Adm. Ted Branch, Rear Adm. Dave Thomas assumes command of Task Force 41 (CTF 41), the U.S. Navy's sea-based element supporting JTF-Haiti. Thomas is embarked aboard the task force's flagship, the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD-5). The Bataan Amphibious Ready Group, with elements of the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), are specially configured for sustained humanitarian assistance missions, including air and sealift capabilities, medical and engineering support and water purification. The Navy formally established Commander Carrier Strike Group One (COMCARSTRKGRU 1 or CCSG 1) in San Diego, California on 1 October 2009. The flagship for CSG 1 will be the USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), currently homeported in Newport News, Va. Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 1, USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) and USS Lake Champlain (CG-57) will round out the strike group. Commanded by Rear Adm. Ted Twig Branch, CSG 1 will be a San Diego-based operational command and will report to Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet. "We are excited by the opportunity to establish this new command and bring the power of the Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group online in support of our nation's defense, said Branch. I'm also very happy to bring this capability, along with the men and women who make it possible, to the great city of San Diego." Carrier Strike Group 1s first mission is expected to be a transit around South America in the spring of 2010 as Vinson relocates to its new homeport of San Diego. In support of the nations maritime strategy, CSG-1 will help promote regional partnerships, deter crisis, project power, promote maritime security, and provide humanitarian assistance or disaster relief within the U.S. Pacific Fleets 100 million square-mile area of operations. The Navy took redelivery of Vinson July 11, 2009, following the successful completion of the ships midlife Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH). Carl Vinson is the third Nimitz-class aircraft carrier to complete RCOH at Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding-Newport News and is undergoing a four-month post-refueling shipyard maintenance period to prepare for its transit to San Diego (Ref. SAN DIEGO October 1, 2009 - Release 42-09 - 375).

The Carl Vinson (CVN-70), the 70th aircraft carrier of the United States Navy by Hull No. and in order of commission, the 58th, commissioning at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Virginia on 13 March 1982, was redelivered to the U.S. Navy by the Northrop Grumman Corp. on 11 July 2009, under going a mid-life Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) from 11 November 2005 to 28 June 2009, where she was completely refitted, and the nuclear fuel that powers the Nimitz-class carrier were replenished in a period of 3 1/2 years, while CVN-70 departed Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipyard for ship yard sea trials conducted in the Western Atlantic from 29 June to 2 July 2009, returning to Norfolk, Virginia on 3 July 2009. Carl Vinson was towed from Naval Station Norfolk to Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipyard in order to begin the RCOH on 11 November 2005 (commencing planning for 2005s RCOH upon return from her second around-the-world deployment and home port transfer from Bremerton, Washington, from 13 January to 31 July 2005. The crew of Carl Vinson, fresh from a global combat deployment and a change of homeport from Bremerton, Wash., to Norfolk, Va., carried out their Shipboard Coordinated Offload and Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) in October in preparation for Carl Vinsons mid-lifecycle overhaul. On 9 May 2007, Carl Vinson transited the James River en route to a pier-side dock after completing an 18-month dry dock period at Northrop Grumman Newport News (Ref. 72, 76, 375, 553 & Story Number: NNS051016-04 Release Date: 10/16/2005 10:10:00 AM By Journalist 2nd Class (SW/AW) Jason McCammack, USS Carl Vinson Public Affairs USS CARL VINSON (NNS)). http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20593

USS George Washington (CVN-73) 7th

(Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region

Pacific Ocean

Sea of Japan

 

 

11 May 2010

14 May 2010

Training

4-days

Sea Trials off the coast of Japan

USS George Washington (CVN-73) 7th

(Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region

Pacific Ocean

Sea of Japan

WestPac

CVW-5

NF

18 May 2010

8 June 2010

Training

24-days

 

Carrier Qualifications (CQ) off the coast of Japan and Combat Operations Efficiency (COE) evaluation in the Western Pacific.

 

CVW 5, commanded by Capt. Michael S. White, includes four F/A-18 Strike Fighter squadrons (VFA): the Royal Maces of VFA-27, the Diamondbacks of VFA-102, the Golden Dragons of VFA-192 and the Dambusters of VFA-195. It also features Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 115 Liberty Bells, Carrier Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (VAQ) 136 Gauntlets, Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 14 Chargers, as well as detachments from Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30 Providers and Light Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HSL) 51 Warlords.

 

No port of calls from 18 May to 8 June 2010, other then Yokosuka, Japan.

 

Departing Yokosuka May 18, GW has been patrolling the waters of the Western Pacific Ocean to help enhance security, stability and prosperity across the region returning to her home port on 8 June 2010, after conducting Carrier Qualifications (CQ) off the coast of Japan and Combat Operations Efficiency (COE) evaluation in the Western from 18 May to 8 June 2010 (GW Departs on Summer Patrol) and returned to her forward-deployed base of Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, July 3, after a three-week underway period on time to celebrate the 18th anniversary of her commissioning on Independence Day from 8 to 14 June 2010 (GW Returns for 18th Birthday), inport until the 13th, departing on the morning of the 14th. A big part of that mission falls on the pilots of CVW 5, who maintain the ship's mission readiness with a total of 6,798 catapult launches. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=54481

 

Therefore, while COE can be conducted on deployment, more celerity must be presented by the Navy in order to determine actual deployment dates. Yet based on (GW Departs on Summer Patrol), the 18 May date of deployment commencement is questioned and was not used. A training cruise can become a Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) if an aircraft carrier operates over 30 days in foreign waters and or visits a foreign port other then Japan or US state side ports. On rare occasions, an aircraft carrier steamed in the Atlantic and the Med or had a President or Prime Minister aboard as a guest while in foreign waters operating less then 30-days. Steaming with foreign ships while on either exercises or operations in foreign water operating less then 30-days is not considered a FWFD. Aircraft Carriers training cruises state side within the Territorial waters, or a territorial sea, as defined by the 1982 United Nations Convention ... 10 Contiguous zone claims; 11 Extended continental shelf claims ... as its territorial waters and the U.S. has twice enforced freedom of navigation rights waters that exceed one month is considered training unless a port visit to the coastal seaport city of Vancouver on the mainland of British Columbia, Canada occurs, or coastal cities in the Atlantic in Canada are visited by east coast aircraft carriers. Aircraft carriers operating less then a month in the Cuba AOR are not considered FWFDs, like common wealth states are not counted as foreign ports of call, yet 30-days or more of operations in the Caribbean, Atlantic, Pacific, etc., outside the U. S. Territorial waters. It is not clear the length of an at-sea period of an aircraft carrier that is a considered a deployment by the U.S. Navy. For example, Ronald Regans first east to west coast cruise was not counted as a deployment and by my count, Enterprise has made more FWFDs then the number the U.S. Navy is suggesting.

 

It seems the U.S. Navy only counts deployments that extend three months and not east to west or vice versa cruises unless the aircraft carrier operates in AORs for an extended period of time. I Dont understand why numbering deployments of aircraft carriers by some sort of supported means isnt sought after by the U.S. Navy. Therefore, so that I could say, my CV-43 deployment was such and such numbered FWFD, I had to research, read, review and well, create, compile and rewrite U.S. Aircraft Carrier Deployment History from 1922 to present. Im tired too and after nine years of work ending this year, the complete history of U.S. Aircraft Carriers less ship log or Command History Reports not available unless I create $130,000.00 to purchase them, the most historically accurate report ever created by one person or for that matter anyone in the world. Those few Americans and a host of foreign concerns who either enjoy reading about or want to learn about the details of how aircraft carriers are deployed, to include exercises and operations disclosed.

 

Commanded by Rear Adm. Kevin Donegan, the George Washington Carrier Strike Group with more than 5,000 Sailors, is also comprised of 7th Fleets Forward Deployed Naval Forces veterans: Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5; Destroyer Squadron 15 and the guided-missile cruisers USS Shiloh (CG-67) and USS Cowpens (CG-63).

 

After viewing every George Washington article from 18 May to November 1, 2010, the EQNEEDF cannot view 18 May to 1 November 2010 as one deployment, although pulling in for the ships anniversary while on deployment is reasonable, which would possibly begin the forward deployed Carriers deployment beginning on 8 June 2010 after an inport period after completing CQs and COE. Beginning the deployment on 18 May 2010 is a stretch so I think Yeomans need to be clearer, especially when one article declares Departs on Summer Patrol on 9 June 2010. None the less, an underway period, forward deployed as GW is, involves no foreign port call other then its home base of Japan during training of exercises.

 

CTF 70 Changes Command

 

Commander, USS George Washington Carrier Strike Group, Task Force 70, Task Force 75 and Carrier Strike Group 5 changed hands during a change of command ceremony aboard USS George Washington (CVN-73) on 29 May 2010. U.S. 7th Fleet Commander Vice Adm. John M. Bird served as guest speaker as Rear Adm. Dan Cloyd relieved Rear Adm. Kevin M. Donegan. "Just 20 months ago, I stood in the hangar bay as we welcomed Admiral Donegan to CTF-70 (Commander Task Force 70). I was honored then to kick off that chapter of his career and I am especially honored to be here today closing the chapter of an absolutely remarkable command tour," said Bird. "Very few leaders in our military, especially one-star admirals, have such wide-ranging responsibility, scope of authority or opportunity to lead such a lethal, combat ready force of ships, aircraft and the personnel that fight them. Admiral Donegan's ability to do just that has been most impressive and proven time and time again. "Command at sea is the essence of the U.S. Navy, and command of a carrier strike group is the pinnacle of command at sea," said Bird. Donegan pointed to his staff and the members of CTF 70 as the key to his success. "For me, it's all about our Sailors. All about what we can do is because of capabilities made possible by our high-tech equipment," said Donegan. "However, that's just potential to me; the heart and soul of the ability to operate those things to the fullest of their capabilities is our Sailors. Their ingenuity, their dedication and their problem solving." Donegan, who will be the next director of Operation for U.S. Central Command, imparted his confidence in Cloyd's abilities. "He is a strategic thinker and a proven operator. The bottom line is: [CTF 70 is] in good hands," said Donegan. "I am humbled by the utterly priceless opportunity to be assuming command of what I believe, and you know, is the most capable, most unique and most important arm of our maritime power," said Cloyd. "What matters most is what we achieve today, what we achieve in the future and what we achieve in the Forward-Deployed Naval Forces. The opportunity we have now is to set the standard for operational excellence and for war-fighting excellence in 2010 and beyond" (Ref. Story Number: NNS100603-06 - Release Date: 6/3/2010 9:30:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class B.R. Morgan, USS George Washington Public Affairs, USS GEORGE WASHINGTON, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53785

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) - U. S. Fleet Forces Command, 6th, 5th & Central Command

(4th Arabian / Persian Gulf dep.) (7th & 8th Red Sea & Gulf of Aden))

NorLant

6th Med 7th Suez Canal

3rd MSO

2nd OEF

4th OIF /

1st OND

8th Suez Canal Med

NorLant

CVW-3

AC

21 May 2010

 

20 Dec 2010

Europe

Middle East

Afghanistan War &

Maritime Security Operations

Persian Gulf

7th FWFD

214-days

100th anniversary of French Naval Aviation, 3rd Maritime Security Operations (MSO), supporting operations that are focused on reassuring regional partners of the United States' commitment to security, which promotes stability and global prosperity and 2nd Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001 and 4th Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein continues, beginning on 20 March 2003 with the firing of Tomahawk missiles from U.S. ships in the Arabian Gulf and Red Sea and or 1st Operation New Dawn (OND) in Iraq, while OIF is officially still a Theater of Operation in support of military troops on the ground in Iraq, U.S. Soldiers and Personnel training Iraq Soldiers and providing security for U.S. Citizens and Soldiers and Airman of the Armed Forces of the Republic of the United States of America.

 

Ports of call included: Marseille, France; anchored off the coast of Hyers to observe the air show celebrating the 100th anniversary of French Naval Aviation; Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates twice and Souda Bay, Crete.

 

CVW-3 consists of Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 32, 37 and 105; Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 312; Electronic Attack Squadron 130; Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126; Carrier Logistics Support Squadron 40; and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 7.

 

CVW-3 Squadrons: VFA-32, FA-18A; VMFA-312, FA-18C(N); VFA-37, FA-18C(N); VFA-105, FA-18E; VAQ-130, EA-6B; VAW-126, E-2C 2000 NP; HS-7, SH-60F / HH-60H; and VRC-40 Det. 1, C-2A.

 

The HSTCSG includes Rear Admiral Patrick Driscoll, Commander Carrier Strike Group 10 (CSG-10), is made up of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), with its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3) and embarked Destroyer Squadron (CDS) 26; the guided-missile cruiser USS Normandy (CG-60), and guided-missile destroyers USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG-81), USS Oscar Austin (DDG-79), USS Ross (DDG-71) and German Frigate FGS Hessen (F-221).

 

Shortly after departing Norfolk May 21, the Truman CSG participated in the 100th anniversary of French naval aviation celebration. French aircraft landed and catapulted off Truman, while F/A-18s and E-2s from CVW 3 touched down on the French nuclear aircraft carrier CVN Charles de Gaulle (R-91). French maintenance crews embarked aboard Truman to conduct a practice engine change on a French Rafale F3 in Truman's hangar bay.

The Truman CSG joined the 5
th Fleet Area of Operations in June 2010 and began combat operations in support of OEF and OND. During the next five months, CVW 3 aircrews flew 2,915 missions into Afghanistan and Iraq, providing vital close air support to coalition forces on the ground.

 

While operating in the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea, several Truman CSG ships rescued mariners adrift at sea. The visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) teams from Winston S. Churchill rescued 62 distressed mariners after their dhow capsized in the Gulf of Aden Sept. 27, while the VBSS team from Oscar Austin provided assistance to two Iranian mariners after their dhow sank Nov. 18.

 

The ships of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 were essential in maintaining peace and stability throughout the 5th Fleet AOR," said Capt. Bob Barwis, commander, DESRON 26.

Returning a few days before Christmas, the leadership aboard
Truman is both proud and thankful to have safely achieved so much while deployed for 213 days and traveling nearly 55,000 nautical miles.

USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) - Pacific Fleet

EastPac

RIMPAC 2010

TSTA

CVW-14

NK

2 Jun 2010

8 Aug 2010

Training Operations

68-days

6th FWFD

Conducted an extended training period with DESRON 7 staff and ships, to conduct Flight Deck Certification off the coast of Southern California, participating in Canada's International Fleet Review (IFR) from 9 to 12 June 2010 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada after accepting an invitation from the host country Canadian, commemorating the 100th birthday of the Canadian Navy in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; Tailored Ship Training Availability (TSTA) in the Eastern Pacific and RIMPAC 2010 in the Hawaiian Operating Area.

 

The squadrons of CVW-14 include the "Redcocks" of VFA-22, "Fist of the Fleet" of VFA-25 "Stingers" of VFA-113, "Eagles" of VFA-115, "Black Eagles" of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 113, "Cougars" of Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (VAQ) 139, "Providers" of Carrier Logistics Support (VRC) 30 and the "Black Knights" of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 4.

 

The Ronald Reagan Strike Group is comprised of Rear Adm. Scott Hebner, Commander, Carrier Strike Group Seven (CCSG 7), CVW-14, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) Seven (CDS 7), the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), the guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62), which include the guided-missile destroyers USS Decatur (DDG-73), USS Howard (DDG-83) and USS Gridley (DDG-101), and the guided missile frigate USS Thach (FFG-43). A detachment from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 11 will also be embarked aboard the carrier.

USS George Washington (CVN-73) 7th (3rd Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region

Pacific Ocean

4th WestPac Sea of Japan

CVW-5

NF

14 Jun 2010

1 Nov 2010

WestPac

141-days

15th FWFD

GW Departs on Summer Patrol

GW Returns for 18th Birthday

 

George Washington departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan June 14, once again getting underway just four days after returning to port, returning to her forward-deployed base of Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, July 3, after a three-week underway period on time to celebrate the 18th anniversary of her commissioning on Independence Day.

 

Working with other maritime forces can help increase stability within the region and also decrease misunderstandings and tensions, Lausman said. GW and its crew of approximately 3,200 Sailors, recently returned from 24 days of training where the crew successfully completed Combat Operations Efficiency (COE) qualifications which included equipment testing and carrier landing qualifications with embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5. The COE certification, sometimes called a "blue-water certification," allows the ship and air wing team to launch and recover aircraft without the requirement for a divert airfield if operationally necessary. During that time, GW's flight deck crew completed 1,300 aircraft launches and more than 1,400 arrested landings.

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=54481

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=56912

 

GW CSG Returns to Forward Deployed Port of Yokosuka, Japan

 

At the beginning of the patrol, GW participated in an undersea warfare exercise (USWEX) with Japanese naval forces from the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF). The exercise focused on training and coordination of anti-submarine warfare efforts between the maritime partners. During the exercise, JMSDF Sailors were embarked aboard GW and were tasked with locating, tracking and completing simulated engagements with allied submarines in their vicinity. "This exercise afforded us the opportunity of working side by side with our JMSDF counterparts on board GW," said Lt. Justin Santos, a surface operations officer for DESRON 15. "They were standing watch in the same spaces we were and holding briefs throughout the day alongside us as well. Having them on board was a benefit to the success of this exercise."

 

Following USWEX, GW participated in the U.S.-Republic of Korea (ROK) combined alliance military exercise "Invincible Spirit" July 28, which began July 25, involving the two longtime allies combining their military forces for operations in the Sea of Japan, the Yellow Sea and throughout the Korean peninsula, furthering their communication and readiness in surface, air and sea operations. GW then participated in the joint military exercise Valiant Shield, an exercise in which the Marine Corps and Air Force also participated. Operations were conducted to train the participants in command and control, maritime interdiction, anti-submarine warfare, intelligence surveillance, reconnaissance and personnel recovery. Valiant Shield brought approximately 20 U.S. Navy vessels together, including a nuclear powered aircraft carrier, a large deck amphibious assault ship, four guided-missile destroyers, four nuclear-powered submarines, two guided-missile frigates, two minesweepers and one guided-missile cruiser manned by approximately 10,000 Sailors from bases in Japan, Guam, Hawaii and San Diego. More than 2,200 Marines from the Marine Corps' 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, as well as 150 aircraft from the 13th Air Force Expeditionary Wing took part in the exercise.

 

Ports of call include: Busan, Republic of Korea; Changi Naval Base, Singapore; Manila, Philippines and Laem Chaband, Thailand

 

CVW 5 includes four F/A-18 Strike Fighter squadrons (VFA): the "Royal Maces" of VFA-27 (FA-18E); the "Diamondbacks of VFA-102 (FA-18F); the "Eagles" of VFA-115 (FA-18E) and the "Dambusters" of VFA-195 (FA-18C(N)). It also features Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 115 "Liberty Bells" (E-2C Hawkeye 2000 NP); Carrier Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (VAQ) 136 "Gauntlets" (EA-6B); Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 14 "Chargers" (SH-60F/HH-60H); as well as detachments from Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30 DET.5 "Providers" (C-2A) and Light Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HSL) 51 DET.3 "Warlords" (SH-60B).

 

Rear Admiral Dan Cloyd assumed command of Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70, the U.S. Navy's largest battle force in May 2010, from Rear Admiral Kevin M. Donegan, serving from December 2008 to May 2010.

 

Task Force 70 is the Battle Force for U.S. 7th Fleet Commander, Task Force 70 (CTF 70) has operational control of all carrier strike groups and independently deployed cruisers, destroyers and frigates that deploy or transit through the 7th Fleet area of operations.

 

Commanded by Rear Admiral Dan Cloyd, the George Washington is the flagship of George Washington Carrier Strike Group, Task Force 70 and Carrier Strike Group Five (formerly CarGru 5), with more than 5,000 Sailors, with Strike Warfare Commander; staffs of Battle Force 7th Fleet/CSG 5; Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW 5) and its nine squadrons and Destroyer Squadron 15 embarked. CSG 5 includes Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruisers and Destroyer Squadron Fifteen (CDS 15), which serves as the Sea Combat Commander and is responsible for Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruisers and assigned Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers.

 

Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruisers USS Shiloh (CG-67) and USS Cowpens (CG-63) and Arleigh Burke-class destroyers USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG-54), USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62), USS John S. McCain (DDG-56), USS Lassen (DDG-82), USS McCampbell (DDG-85), USS Mustin (DDG-89) and USS Stethem (DDG-63). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=60974

 

USS George Washington (CVN-73) and surface combatant ships operate out of Yokosuka, Japan, while CVW 5 operates out of Atsugi, Japan, when not embarked on George Washington Together, these units form the U.S. Navy's only continuously forward deployed (and largest) carrier strike group.

 

The CSG 5 Commander also serves as Battle Force Seventh Fleet and Commander, Task Force (CTF 70) for 7th Fleet. In these responsibilities, CSG 5 serves as the Commander of all surface forces (carrier strike groups, independently deploying cruisers, destroyers and frigates) in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. CTF 70 also serves as the Theater Surface Warfare Commander (TSUWC) and Theater Integrated Air Missile Defense Commander (TIAMDC) for Seventh Fleet.

 

Carrier Strike Group 5, also known as CSG 5 or CARSTRKGRU 5, is the U.S. Navy carrier strike group assigned to the United States Pacific Fleet and permanently forward deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet.

 

CSG 5 is responsible for unit-level training, integrated training, and material readiness for the groups ships and aviation squadrons. As the only continuously forward deployed carrier strike group, the CSG-5 staff does not stand down when the strike group is in Yokosuka, but instead continues to maintain command responsibilities over deploying Carrier Strike Groups and independently deployed cruisers, destroyers, and frigates that operate in the Seventh Fleet operating area. The commander and staff are also responsible for the higher level Task Force 70 duties throughout the year in addition to the CSG-5 duties. The composition of the strike group in immediate proximity of the George Washington varies throughout the year.

 

George Washington CSG includes the embarked staffs of Destroyer Squadron 15/DESRON FIFTEEN.

 

DESRON FIFTEEN is the Navy's only forward-deployed Destroyer Squadron and is responsible for the readiness, tactical and administrative responsibilities for seven Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. The destroyers' squadron commodore serves as the immediate Superior in Command (ISIC) of the ships assigned to the squadron.

 

DESRON FIFTEEN ships are the principal surface forces of Battle Force Seventh Fleet in the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans. In addition to duties as ISIC for the seven ships assigned to the squadron, the DESRON FIFTEEN staff also deploys with the George Washington carrier strike group (CSG). During these deployments, the Commodore serves as Sea Combat Commander (SCC) for the CSG. The SCC responsibilities include Surface Warfare Commander (SWC), Anti-Submarine Warfare employment of attack submarines assigned to the CS.

 

DESRON FIFTEEN has additional assignments in the Seventh Feet as the Maritime Counter - Special Operations Force Commander (MCSOF), Strike Force ASW Commander (SFASWC) and Deputy Ballistic Missile Defense Commander (BMDC).

USS George Washington (CVN-73) 7th (4th Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region

Pacific Ocean

Sea of Japan 4th WestPac

CVW-5

NF

9 Jul 2010

1 Nov 2010

15th FWFD

116-days

Summer Underway Period

Summer 2010 patrol, Combined alliance maritime and air readiness exercise Invincible Spirit in the seas east of the Korean peninsula and joint exercise Valiant Shield 2010 in the Guam operating area.

 

Ports of call included: Busan, Republic of Korea; Changi Naval Base, Singapore; Manila, Philippines and Laem Chaband, Thailand.

 

CVW 5, commanded by Capt. Michael S. White, includes four F/A-18 Strike Fighter squadrons (VFA): the Royal Maces of VFA-27, the Diamondbacks of VFA-102, the Golden Dragons of VFA-192 and the Dambusters of VFA-195. It also features Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 115 Liberty Bells, Carrier Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (VAQ) 136 Gauntlets, Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 14 Chargers, as well as detachments from Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30 Providers and Light Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HSL) 51 Warlords.

 

Rear Admiral Dan Cloyd assumed command of Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70, the U.S. Navy's largest battle force in May 2010, from Rear Admiral Kevin M. Donegan, serving from December 2008 to May 2010.

 

Task Force 70 is the Battle Force for U.S. 7th Fleet Commander, Task Force 70 (CTF 70) has operational control of all carrier strike groups and independently deployed cruisers, destroyers and frigates that deploy or transit through the 7th Fleet area of operations.

 

Commanded by Rear Admiral Dan Cloyd, the George Washington is the flagship of George Washington Carrier Strike Group, Task Force 70 and Carrier Strike Group Five (formerly CarGru 5), with more than 5,000 Sailors, with Strike Warfare Commander; staffs of Battle Force 7th Fleet/CSG 5; Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW 5) and its nine squadrons and Destroyer Squadron 15 embarked. CSG 5 includes Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruisers and Destroyer Squadron Fifteen (CDS 15), which serves as the Sea Combat Commander and is responsible for Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruisers and assigned Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers.

 

Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruisers USS Shiloh (CG-67) and USS Cowpens (CG-63) and Arleigh Burke-class destroyers USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG-54), USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62), USS John S. McCain (DDG-56), USS Lassen (DDG-82), USS McCampbell (DDG-85), USS Mustin (DDG-89) and USS Stethem (DDG-63). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=60974

 

USS George Washington (CVN-73) and surface combatant ships operate out of Yokosuka, Japan, while CVW 5 operates out of Atsugi, Japan, when not embarked on George Washington Together, these units form the U.S. Navy's only continuously forward deployed (and largest) carrier strike group.

 

The CSG 5 Commander also serves as Battle Force Seventh Fleet and Commander, Task Force (CTF 70) for 7th Fleet. In these responsibilities, CSG 5 serves as the Commander of all surface forces (carrier strike groups, independently deploying cruisers, destroyers and frigates) in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. CTF 70 also serves as the Theater Surface Warfare Commander (TSUWC) and Theater Integrated Air Missile Defense Commander (TIAMDC) for Seventh Fleet.

 

Carrier Strike Group 5, also known as CSG 5 or CARSTRKGRU 5, is the U.S. Navy carrier strike group assigned to the United States Pacific Fleet and permanently forward deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet.

 

CSG 5 is responsible for unit-level training, integrated training, and material readiness for the groups ships and aviation squadrons. As the only continuously forward deployed carrier strike group, the CSG-5 staff does not stand down when the strike group is in Yokosuka, but instead continues to maintain command responsibilities over deploying Carrier Strike Groups and independently deployed cruisers, destroyers, and frigates that operate in the Seventh Fleet operating area. The commander and staff are also responsible for the higher level Task Force 70 duties throughout the year in addition to the CSG-5 duties. The composition of the strike group in immediate proximity of the George Washington varies throughout the year.

 

George Washington CSG includes the embarked staffs of Destroyer Squadron 15/DESRON FIFTEEN.

 

DESRON FIFTEEN is the Navy's only forward-deployed Destroyer Squadron and is responsible for the readiness, tactical and administrative responsibilities for seven Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. The destroyers' squadron commodore serves as the immediate Superior in Command (ISIC) of the ships assigned to the squadron.

 

DESRON FIFTEEN ships are the principal surface forces of Battle Force Seventh Fleet in the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans. In addition to duties as ISIC for the seven ships assigned to the squadron, the DESRON FIFTEEN staff also deploys with the George Washington carrier strike group (CSG). During these deployments, the Commodore serves as Sea Combat Commander (SCC) for the CSG. The SCC responsibilities include Surface Warfare Commander (SWC), Anti-Submarine Warfare employment of attack submarines assigned to the CS.

 

DESRON FIFTEEN has additional assignments in the Seventh Feet as the Maritime Counter - Special Operations Force Commander (MCSOF), Strike Force ASW Commander (SFASWC) and Deputy Ballistic Missile Defense Commander (BMDC).

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) - Pacific Fleet, 7th, 5th & Central Command (3rd North Arabian Sea dep.) (8th Arabian/Persian Gulf dep.) dep. with two cruises to the Persian Gulf)

10th WestPac

3rd MSO

3rd OEF

OND

CVW-2

NE

7 Sep 2010

24 Mar 2011

Western Pacific Middle East

Afghanistan War

Persian Gulf

199-days

Ships 12th FWFD

2nd Maritime Security Operations (MSO), to protect offshore infrastructure, including Iraqi oil platforms, which provide a critical source of income for the new Iraqi government and supporting operations that are focused on reassuring regional partners of the United States commitment to security, which promotes stability and global prosperity; to ensure that ships could "operate freely while transiting the world's oceans" during the Global War on Terrorism, on her 3rd Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001 and Operation New Dawn.

 

Ports of call: Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California twice; Port Klang, Malaysia; Bahrain; Dubai, United Arab Emirates; United Arab Emirates; Singapore and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

 

Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 aircraft consist of, Boeing / McDonnell-Douglas F/A-18F Super Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron TWO (VFA-2) Bounty Hunters, F/A-18E Hornets of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137 Kestrels," FA-18C (N) Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 151 Vigilantes, FA-18C (N) Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34 Blue Blasters, EA-6B Prowler of Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron ONE THREE ONE or VAQ-131, Lancers, E-2C Hawkeye 2000 NP of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE ONE SIX or VAW-116 and C-2 Greyhound of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron THREE ZERO Det. TWO or VRC-30 Det. 2, Helicopter Combat Support Special Squadron (HSC-12) and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Mine Squadron (HSM-77) (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is the flagship of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, Commander Rear Adm. Scott Swift, relieved by Rear Adm. Mark D. Guadagnini on 29 January 2010; which consists of embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 commander, Capt. John Eden, Commodore, Destroyer Squadron 9, San Diego-based guided-missile cruiser USS Cape St. George (CG-71), and the embarked Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9, commander, Capt. Capt. Carol Hottenrott, which includes the Everett-based destroyers USS Momsen (DDG-92) and USS Shoup (DDG-86), as well as the San Diego-based destroyers USS Halsey (DDG-97) and USS Sterett (DDG-104) (Ref. Story Number: NNS100923-05 - Release Date: 9/23/2010 8:56:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brian Morales, Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS100929-03 - Release Date: 9/29/2010 5:51:00 AM - By Lt. Jacquelyn R. Bengfort, USS Shoup Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS100130-07 - Release Date: 1/30/2010 7:06:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56136

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56177

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=50960

USS George Washington (CVN-73) 7th (Forward Deployed)

Western Pacific Region

Pacific Ocean

Sea of Japan WestPac

KS 2011

CVW-5

NF

24 Nov 2010

14 Dec 2010

Training

21-days

Keen Sword 2011 with Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) personnel and their U.S. counterpart.

 

CVW 5, commanded by Capt. Michael S. White, includes four F/A-18 Strike Fighter squadrons (VFA): the Royal Maces of VFA-27, the Diamondbacks of VFA-102, the Golden Dragons of VFA-192 and the Dambusters of VFA-195. It also features Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 115 Liberty Bells, Carrier Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (VAQ) 136 Gauntlets, Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 14 Chargers, as well as detachments from Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30 Providers and Light Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HSL) 51 Warlords.

 

Rear Admiral Dan Cloyd assumed command of Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70, the U.S. Navy's largest battle force in May 2010, from Rear Admiral Kevin M. Donegan, serving from December 2008 to May 2010.

 

Task Force 70 is the Battle Force for U.S. 7th Fleet Commander, Task Force 70 (CTF 70) has operational control of all carrier strike groups and independently deployed cruisers, destroyers and frigates that deploy or transit through the 7th Fleet area of operations.

 

Commanded by Rear Admiral Dan Cloyd, the George Washington is the flagship of George Washington Carrier Strike Group, Task Force 70 and Carrier Strike Group Five (formerly CarGru 5), with more than 5,000 Sailors, with Strike Warfare Commander; staffs of Battle Force 7th Fleet/CSG 5; Carrier Air Wing Five (CVW 5) and its nine squadrons and Destroyer Squadron 15 embarked. CSG 5 includes Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruisers and Destroyer Squadron Fifteen (CDS 15), which serves as the Sea Combat Commander and is responsible for Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruisers and assigned Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers.

 

Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruisers USS Shiloh (CG-67) and USS Cowpens (CG-63) and Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG-54), USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62), USS John S. McCain (DDG 56), USS Lassen (DDG-82), USS McCampbell (DDG-85), USS Mustin (DDG-89) and USS Stethem (DDG-63). Also included in the strike group are guided-missile cruisers USS Cowpens (CG-63) and USS Shiloh (CG-67). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=60974

 

USS George Washington (CVN-73) and surface combatant ships operate out of Yokosuka, Japan, while CVW 5 operates out of Atsugi, Japan, when not embarked on George Washington Together, these units form the U.S. Navy's only continuously forward deployed (and largest) carrier strike group.

 

The CSG 5 Commander also serves as Battle Force Seventh Fleet and Commander, Task Force (CTF 70) for 7th Fleet. In these responsibilities, CSG 5 serves as the Commander of all surface forces (carrier strike groups, independently deploying cruisers, destroyers and frigates) in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. CTF 70 also serves as the Theater Surface Warfare Commander (TSUWC) and Theater Integrated Air Missile Defense Commander (TIAMDC) for Seventh Fleet.

 

Carrier Strike Group 5, also known as CSG 5 or CARSTRKGRU 5, is the U.S. Navy carrier strike group assigned to the United States Pacific Fleet and permanently forward deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet.

 

CSG 5 is responsible for unit-level training, integrated training, and material readiness for the groups ships and aviation squadrons. As the only continuously forward deployed carrier strike group, the CSG-5 staff does not stand down when the strike group is in Yokosuka, but instead continues to maintain command responsibilities over deploying Carrier Strike Groups and independently deployed cruisers, destroyers, and frigates that operate in the Seventh Fleet operating area. The commander and staff are also responsible for the higher level Task Force 70 duties throughout the year in addition to the CSG-5 duties. The composition of the strike group in immediate proximity of the George Washington varies throughout the year.

 

George Washington CSG includes the embarked staffs of Destroyer Squadron 15/DESRON FIFTEEN.

 

DESRON FIFTEEN is the Navy's only forward-deployed Destroyer Squadron and is responsible for the readiness, tactical and administrative responsibilities for seven Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. The destroyers' squadron commodore serves as the immediate Superior in Command (ISIC) of the ships assigned to the squadron.

 

DESRON FIFTEEN ships are the principal surface forces of Battle Force Seventh Fleet in the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans. In addition to duties as ISIC for the seven ships assigned to the squadron, the DESRON FIFTEEN staff also deploys with the George Washington carrier strike group (CSG). During these deployments, the Commodore serves as Sea Combat Commander (SCC) for the CSG. The SCC responsibilities include Surface Warfare Commander (SWC), Anti-Submarine Warfare employment of attack submarines assigned to the CS.

 

DESRON FIFTEEN has additional assignments in the Seventh Feet as the Maritime Counter - Special Operations Force Commander (MCSOF), Strike Force ASW Commander (SFASWC) and Deputy Ballistic Missile Defense Commander (BMDC).

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70)

Pacific Fleet, 7th, 5th & Central Command

(6th Arabian Sea & 4th North Arabian Sea dep.)

11th WestPac

11th Indian Ocean

2nd MSO

2nd OEF

CVW-17

AA

30 Nov 2010

15 Jun 2011

Middle East

Afghanistan War

17th FWFD

198-days

Carl Vinson Deploys for Training, Western Pacific

 

COMPTUEX in the Eastern Pacific, 2nd Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001 (CVW-17 flew 1,085 OEF missions, totaling 6,600 total flight hours.), her 2nd Maritime Security Operations (MSO), to protect offshore infrastructure, including Iraqi oil platforms, which provide a critical source of income for the new Iraqi government and supporting operations that are focused on reassuring regional partners of the United States commitment to security, which promotes stability and global prosperity; to ensure that ships could "operate freely while transiting the world's oceans" during the Global War on Terrorism, on her, Operation New Dawn, an operation in Trekh Nawa in the summer of 2010 and participating in Exercise Malabar 2012 with the Indian Navy, in the vicinity of Chennai, in the Bay of Bengal, and west of the Nicobar Islands.

 

Ports of call: Victoria Harbor, Hong Kong; Dubai, United Arab Emirates; Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates; anchored off the coast of Chennai, India; Fremantle and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

 

The squadrons of CVW-17 include VFA-22, Fighting Redcocks (FA-18F); VFA-81, Sunliners (FA-18E); VFA-113, Stingers (FA-18C(N)); VFA-25, Fist of the Fleet (FA-18C(N)); VAQ-134, Garudas (EA-6B); VAW-125, Tigertails (E-2C Hawkeye 2000 NP); HS-15; Red Lions (SH-60F/HH-60H) and VRC-40 DET.5, Rawhides (C-2A NP).

 

Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1 held a change of command ceremony aboard USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) Oct. 26, 2010. Rear Adm. Samuel Perez relieved Rear Adm. Ted "Twig" Branch as commander, Carrier Strike Group 1. CSG-1, with Branch as its first commander, was formally established Oct. 1, 2009. The strike group is comprised of Carl Vinson, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 1, USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) and USS Lake Champlain (CG-57). Carrier Strike Group One Conducts Change of Command Ceremony. Carl Vinson helps provide deterrence, promote peace and security, preserve freedom of the sea and humanitarian/disaster response within 3rd Fleet's 50-million square mile area of responsibility in the Eastern Pacific, as well as supporting the nation's maritime strategy when forward deployed; Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet Vice Adm. Gerald R. Beaman (Ref. Story Number: NNS101028-09 - Release Date: 10/28/2010 2:46:00 PM - By Carrier Strike Group One Public Affairs, NORTH ISLAND, Ca (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=56857

 

Beaman takes command of 3rd Fleet

 

The Navys top West Coast command changed hands Thursday when Vice Adm. Gerald R. Beaman took the helm of U.S. 3rd Fleet. Beaman replaces Vice Adm. Richard W. Hunt, who became the fleet commander in June 2009. The change-of-command ceremony was held on the flight deck of amphibious assault ship Makin Island in San Diego, where the crowd included Adm. Patrick Walsh, the Pacific Fleet commander. Hunts next assignment isnt far from the fleet headquarters atop the bluff at Point Loma in San Diego. He is slated to take command of Naval Surface Forces and Naval Surface Force-Pacific, based across San Diego Bay in Coronado. Beaman, a naval flight officer with more than 3,500 flight hours and 1,067 carrier landings, has completed several command tours, including commander of Carrier Air Wing 2 and Fighter Squadron 211, according to his official biography. Recently he served with U.S. Fleet Forces Command as deputy chief of staff for global force management, joint operations and training. Hunt, a surface warfare officer, has commanded Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa, Carrier Strike Group 6, the cruiser Philippine Sea and frigate Crommelin. His staff assignments included programming division director with the Navy staff and executive assistant to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, according to his biography. Third Fleet covers a region that includes 60,000 sailors and Marines, five carriers, 73 ships, 35 submarines and more than 350 aircraft, according to the Navy. Its forces routinely deploy to the 4th Fleet, 5th Fleet and 7th Fleet regions, including major joint exercises such as Rim of the Pacific and Talisman Saber, humanitarian missions including Pacific Partnership and disaster relief in Japan, and defense support to local, state and other civilian authorities (Ref. By Gidget Fuentes New York Times Staff writer - Posted : Friday Apr 22, 2011 19:06:48 EDT)

http://www.navytimes.com/news/2011/04/marine-third-fleet-command-042211

 

Carl Vinson helps provide deterrence, promote peace and security, preserve freedom of the sea and humanitarian/disaster response within 3rd Fleet's 50-million square mile area of responsibility in the Eastern Pacific, as well as supporting the nation's maritime strategy when forward deployed; Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet Vice Adm. Gerald R. Beaman (ref. Vinson Welcomes Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet - Story Number: NNS110927-09 - Release Date: 9/27/2011 5:40:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Byron C. Linder, USS Carl Vinson Public Affairs, USS CARL VINSON, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=62953

Persian Gulf, arm of the Arabian Sea, 90,000 sq mi (233,100 sq km), between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran, extends c.600 mi (970 km) from the Shatt al Arab delta to the Strait of Hormuz, which links it with the Gulf of Oman

Ref. U. S. Navy Deployment History Resources

 

 

U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployment History

FWFDs from 2000 to Present

Part 1 - 2000 FWFDs

Part 2 - 2001 to 2002 FWFDs

Part 3 - 2003 to 2004 FWFDs

Part 4 - 2005 to 2006 FWFDs

Part 5 - 2007 to 2008 FWFDs

Part 6 - 2009 FWFDs

Part 7 - 2010 FWFDs

Part 8 - 2011 FWFDs

Part 9 - 2012 to 2013 FWFDs

Part 10 - 2014 to 2015 FWFDs

Part 11 - 2016 to 2017 FWFDs

Part 12 - 2018 to 2019 FWFDs

Part 13 - 2020 to 2021 FWFDs

Part 14 - 2022 to 2023 FWFDs