U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS RECORD OF

EAST/WEST COAST TRANSFERS AND TRANSITS

Part 9 of 9 – 2018 to Present

 

 

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw - 24 April 1980

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 1980)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS RECORD OF

EAST/WEST COAST TRANSFERS AND TRANSITS

(Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal)

September 1945 to Present

 

 

Part 1 of 9 – 1928 to 1945

Part 2 of 9 – 1946 to 1969

Part 3 of 9 – 1970 to 1989

Part 4 of 9 – 1990 to 1993

Part 5 of 9 – 1994 to 2000

Part 6 of 9 – 2001 to 2005

Part 7 of 9 – 2006 to 2012

Part 8 of 9 – 2013 to 2017

Part 9 of 9 – 2018 to Present

 

2018

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) - 3rd, 7th, 5th & Central Command (6th Arabian /Persian Gulf dep (3 Trips) & 8th Arabian Sea voy. (Several trips back and forth from the North Arabian Sea)

EastPac

9th WestPac

Philippine Sea

South China Sea

Strait of Malacca

8th IO

Arabian Sea

North Arabian Sea

5th MSO

Gulf of Oman

Strait of Hormuz x 3

Arabian Gulf

Sunda Strait

Java Sea

Gulf of Thailand

Gulf of Tonkin

South

Strait of Singapore

2nd Bab el-Mandeb Strait

2nd Red Sea

2nd Suez Canal

2nd Med

Strait of Gibraltar

Lant

CVW-9

NG

15 Oct 2018

16 May 2019

Middle East

Persian Gulf

10th FWFD

214-days

Home Port Transfer from Naval Base Kitsap, Bremerton, Washington for Naval Station, Norfolk, Va. an John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group (JCSSG) deploys as a supporting operations that are focused on reassuring regional partners of the United States' commitment to security, which promotes stability and global prosperity, as a ongoing rotation of U.S. forces supporting maritime security operations in waters around the world, on her 5th Maritime Security Operations (MSO).

 

Ports of call included: RSS Sinngapura - Changi Naval Base, Singapore; Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates; Laem Chabang, Thiland; Khalifa Bin Salman Port, Bahrain; Marseille, France and Mayport.

 

Squadrons: Strike Fighter Squadrons VFA-41 “Black Aces,” F/A-18F Super Hornet; VFA-14 “Tophatters,” F/A-18E Super Hornet; VFA-97 “Warhawks,” F/A-18C Hornet and VFA-151 “Vigilantes ,“ F/A-18E Hornet; Electronic Attack Squadron 133 (VAQRON 133) (VAQ-133) “Wizards,” EA-6B Prowler;  Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 112 (CARAEWRON 112) (VAW-112) “Golden Hawks,” E-2C Hawkeye; Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 14 (HELSEACOMBATRON 14) (HSC-14) “Chargers,” MH-60S Seahawk; Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 71 (HELMARSTRIKERON 71) (HSM-71) “Raptors,” MH-60R Seahawk and Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 30 (FLELOGSUPPRON 30) (VRC-30 Det. 4) “Providers,” C-2A Greyhound. Destroyer Squadron 21 staff, USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), USS Stockdale (DDG-106), USS Spruance (DDG-111), and USS Chung-Hoon (DDG-93).

 

Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 3 - Commander, Rear Adm. Mike Wettlaufer, former Rear Admiral Fred I. Pyle; Captain Stephen M. Froehlich, Chief of Staff and Command Master Chief, CMDCM(SW/AW) H. Trenton Schmidt.

 

USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) is the strike group's current flagship, USS Mobile Bay (CG-53) and other units currently assigned are the ship's Carrier Air Wing 9 and Destroyer Squadron 21.

 

Destroyer Squadron 21 - Commodore Captain Murzban "Murz" Morris; Captain Dan Cobian, Deputy Commodore and, GSCM(SW/AW) Gabrielson, Senior Enlisted Leader.

 

Destroyer Squadron 21 Ships: USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), USS Stockdale (DDG-106), USS Spruance (DDG-111), and USS Chung-Hoon (DDG-93).

 

2019

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) - Pacific Fleet, 7th, 5th, Central Command & U. S. Fleet Forces Command  (5th North Arabian Sea dep.) Fleet Forces (10th Arabian

/ Persian Gulf dep.)

2nd Med

2nd Suez Canal

12th IO

12th WestPac

3rd MSO

1st OFS

SCS

CVW-7

NE

1 Apr 2019

 

 

Europe

Middle East

Afghanistan War

Persian Gulf

14th FWFD

-days

4th Maritime Security Operations (MSO), on her 1st Operation Freedom's Sentinel “to help secure and build upon the hard-fought gains of the last 13 years," while Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001, drew to a close on 28 December 2014 after 13 years of combat operations and Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR) is the U.S. military's operational name for the military intervention against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIL, in the vernacular, Daesh), including both the campaign in Iraq and the campaign in Syria.

 

Ports of calls included: Palma de Mallorca, Spain Dugm, Oman x 3 and Khalif Bin Salman Port.

 

CVW-7 (AG) - Command Leadership not reported on internet

 

Squadrons: VFA-143 Strike Fighter Squadrons “Pukin Dogs,” FA-18E; VFA-103 “Jolly Rogers,” F/A-18F Hornet; VFA-86 “Sidewinders,” F/A-18F Super Hornet; VFA-25 “Fist of the Fleet,” F/A-18E Hornet; VFA-143 “Pukin Dogs,” F/A-18E Super Hornet; Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 121 (CARAEWRON 121) (VAW-121) “Bluetails,” Northrop-Grumman E-2D Advanced Hawkeye; Electronic Attack Squadron 140 (VAQRON 140) (VAQ-140) “Patriots,” EA-6B Prowler; Fleet Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 5 (HELANTISUBRON 5) (HSC-5) “Night Dippers,” MH-60R, Seahawk (Knighthawk) and Logistics Support Squadron 40 (FLELOGSUPPRON 40) (VRC-40) “Rawhides,” C-2A NP.

 

Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12 - Commander, Rear Admiral Michael E. Boyle; Captain David E. Burke, Chief of Staff and Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW) Marluis E. Stokes.https://www.public.navy.mil/surflant/ccsg12/Pages/default.aspx

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is the strike group's current flagship, Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55) and other units currently assigned are the ship's Carrier Air Wing 7 and Destroyer Squadron 2.

 

Destroyer Squadron 2 - "Second to None" – Commodore Captain Chris Follin; Captain Matthew Kawas, Deputy Commodore and FCACM(SW) Korey J. Jones, Senior Enlisted Advisor.https://www.public.navy.mil/surflant/cds2/Pages/default.aspx

 

Destroyer Squadron 2: the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Mitcher (DDG-57), USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG-81), USS Gonzalez (DDG-66), USS Mason (DDG-87) and USS Nitze (DDG-94).

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75)

Navy's Fleet Forces Command, 2nd, 6th, 5th & Central Command

(7thArabian /Persian Gulf dep. & 7 voys.) (13th & 14th Red Sea & Gulf of Aden)

Lant

EastLant

Strait of Gibraltar

10th Med

13th Suez Canal

6th MSO

2nd OIR

13th Suez Canal

North Arabian Sea

Med

Lant

CVW-7

AG

1 Nov 2019

 

Middle East

ISIS Ops in Iraq and Syria

12th FWFD

-days

 

Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HSTCSG) deploys as a ongoing rotation of U.S. forces supporting maritime security operations in waters around the world, deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of naval operations to ensure maritime stability and security in the Central Region, connecting the Mediterranean and the Pacific through the western Indian Ocean and three strategic choke points, on her 6th Maritime Security Operations (MSO), supporting operations that are focused on reassuring regional partners of the United States' commitment to security, which promotes stability and global prosperity and possily will conduct her 1st Operation Freedom's Sentinel “to help secure and build upon the hard-fought gains of the past," succeeding Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001, in continuation of the Global War on Terrorism. Operation Freedom's Sentinel is part of the NATO-led Resolute Support Mission, which began on January 1, 2015. Operation Enduring Freedom drew to a close on 28 December 2014 after 13 years of combat operations, when President Barack Obama and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel each issued statements marking the end of the combat mission in Afghanistan, in a ceremony at the International Security and Assistance Force headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan and or 2nd Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR) is the U.S. military operation name for the military intervention against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), including both the campaign in Iraq and the campaign in Syria. Effective 22 Sep 2015, III Corps is responsible for Combined Joint Task Force- Operation Inherent Resolve (CJTF-OIR).

 

Ports of calls included:


CVW-1 (AB) - Commander, Captain Robert ‘Fitz’ Gentry; Captain Matthew "Hondo" Barr, Deputy Commander and CMDCM(AW/SW) Benjamin H. Bilyeu.

https://www.public.navy.mil/airfor/cvw1/Pages/default.aspx

 

Squadrons: Strike Fighter Squadrons VFA-11 “Red Rippers, ” F/A-18F Super Hornet; VFA-136 “Knighthawks,” F/A-18E Super Hornet; VFA-211 “Fighting Checkmates,” F/A-18F Super Hornet and VMFA-251 Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 251 “Thunderbolts,” F/A-18C Hornet; Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 125 (VAW-125) “Tigertails,” E-2D Hawkeye; Electronic Attack Squadron 137 (VAQ-137) “Rooks,” EA-18G Growler; Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 40 (VRC-40) “Rawhides,” C-2A Greyhoun; Anti-Submarine Squadron 11 (HS-1) “Dragonslayers,” SH-60F Seahawk and Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 46 (HSM-46)  “Grandmasters,“ MH-60R Seahawk.

 

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) Web Site - Norfolk, Va. - 63rd Commissioned aircraft carrier - Commanding Officer, Captain Kavon “Hak” Hakimzadeh, Captain Dave Snowden, Executive Officer, Command Master Chief, CMDCM (AW/SW/IW) Claude M. Henderson.

https://www.public.navy.mil/airfor/cvn75/Pages/HOME.aspx

 

Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 - Commander, Rear Admiral Andrew J. Loiselle, Captain Steven "Sac" Bellack, Chief of Staff and Command Master Chief. SW/AW) Michael Bates.

https://www.public.navy.mil/surflant/ccsg8/Pages/default.aspx

 

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) is the strike group's current flagship, USS NORMANDY (CG-60) and other units currently assigned are the ship's Carrier Air Wing 1 and Destroyer Squadron 28

 

Destroyer Squadron 28 "Readiness through Training" - Commodore Captain Jennifer S. Couture; Captain James R. Kenny, Deputy Commodore and, GSCM(SW) Thomas Eicks, Senior Enlisted Advisor.

 

Destroyer Squadron 28USS ARLEIGH BURKE (DDG-51); USS RAMAGE (DDG-61); USS BULKELEY (DDG-84); USS FORREST SHERMAN (DDG-98);

USS FARRAGUT (DDG-99); USS GRAVELY (DDG-107) and USS JASON DUNHAM (DDG-109).

https://www.public.navy.mil/surflant/cds28/Pages/default.aspx

 

2020

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2021

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

DEP

AIR WING

T.C.

DEPART

RETURN

Days at  Sea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 1 of 9 – 1928 to 1945

Part 2 of 9 – 1946 to 1969

Part 3 of 9 – 1970 to 1989

Part 4 of 9 – 1990 to 1993

Part 5 of 9 – 1994 to 2000

Part 6 of 9 – 2001 to 2005

Part 7 of 9 – 2006 to 2012

Part 8 of 9 – 2013 to 2017

Part 9 of 9 – 2018 to Present

 

                 U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS RECORD OF

EAST/WEST COAST TRANSFERS AND TRANSITS

(Panama Canal, Cape Horn, Cape of Good Hope and Suez Canal)

September 1945 to Present

 

NO.

CC

CARRIER

Panama Canal

Cape Horn

Cape of Good Hope

Suez Canal

East Coast Transfer

West Coast  Transfer & Japan

1

First Langley AV-3, former CV-1 & Jupiter (AC-3)

1

.

.

.

.

1

2

Fourth Lexington (CV-2), former CC 1

2

.

.

.

.

1

3

Fifth Saratoga (CV-3), former Battle Cruiser #3

3

.

.

.

.

1

4

Sixth Ranger (CV-4)

4

.

.

.

1

1

5

Third Yorktown (CV-5)

3

.

.

.

.

1

6

Seventh Enterprise (CV-6)

2

.

.

.

1

1

7

Eighth Wasp (CV-7)

1

.

.

.

.

1

8

Seventh Hornet (CV-8)

1

.

.

.

.

1

9

Seventh Essex (CVS-9), former CVA-9 & CV-9

1

1

.

2

1

1

10

Fourth Independence (CVL-22), former CV-22 & light cruiser Amsterdam, CL-59

1

.

.

.

.

1

11

Fifth Lexington (AVT-16), former CVT-16, CVS-16, CVA-16, CV-16 & Cabot

1

1

.

.

.

1

12

Fourth Princeton (CVL-23), former CV-23 & Tallahassee (CL-61)

1

.

.

.

.

1

13

Belleau Wood (CVL-24), former CV-24 & New Haven (CL-76)

1

.

.

.

.

.

14

Fourth Yorktown (CVS-10), former CVA-10, CV-10 & Bon Homme Richard

1

1

.

.

1

1

15

Bunker Hill (AVT-9), former CVS-17, CVA-17 & CV-17

1

.

.

.

.

1

16

Cowpens (AVT-1), former CVL-25 & CV-25

1

.

.

.

.

1

17

Monterey (AVT 2), former CVL-26, CV-26 & Dayton (CL-78)

1

.

.

.

.1

.1

18

Second Cabot (AVT-3), former CVL-28, CV-28 &Wilmington (CL-79)

2

.

.

.

.1

.1

19

Fourth Intrepid (CVS-11), former CVA-11 & CV-11

2

5

 

.

               1

.1

.1

20

Second Langley (CVL-27), former CV-27, Fargo (CL-85) & Crown Point (CV-27)

2

.

.

.

.

.1

21

Second San Jacinto (AVT-5), former CVL-30, CV-30, Reprisal & light cruiser Newark  (CL-100)

1

.

.

.

.

.

22

Bataan (CVL-29), former CV-29 & Buffalo (CL-99)

3

.

.

.

1

1

23

Ninth Wasp (CVS-18), former CVA-18, CV-18 & Oriskany

1

1

.

.

1

1

24

Eighth Hornet (CVS-12), former CVA-12, CV-12 & Kearsarge

1

1

.

1

.

1

25

Fifth Franklin (AVT-8), former CV-13

2

.

.

.

.

.

26

Hancock (CV-19), former, CVA, CV-19 & fourth Ticonderoga

1

.

.

.

.

1

27

Fourth Ticonderoga (CVS-14), former CVA-14, CV-14 & Hancock

1

2

.

.

.

1

28

Bennington (CVS-20), former CVA-20 & CV-20

2

1

.

.

.

.

29

Shangri-la (CVS-38), former CVA-38 & CV-38

2

2

2

.

1

1

30

Second Randolph (CVS-15), former CVA-15 & CV-15

2

.

.

.

.

.

31

Second Bon Homme Richard (CV-31), former CVA-31 & CV-31

1

.

.

.

.

1

32

Second Antietam (CVS-36), former CVA-36 & CV-36

2

.

.

.

.

1

33

Fifth Boxer (LPH-4), former CVS-21, CVA-21 & CV-21

4

.

.

.

.

.

34

Second Lake Champlain (CVS-39), former CVA-39 & CV-39

.

.

.

2

.

.

35

Midway (CV-41), former CVA-41 and CVB-41

.

1

1

.

.

2

San Diego, Ca. to Japan to San Diego, Ca.

36

Franklin D. Roosevelt (CV-42), former CVA-42, CVB-42 & Coral Sea (CVB-42)

.

4

2

.

.

1

37

Fifth Princeton (LPH-5), former CVS-37, CVA-37, CV & Valley Forge

1

.

.

.

.

1

38

Tarawa (CV-40)

2

.

.

2

1

1

39

Third Kearsarge CVS-33, former CVA-33 & CV-33

1.

         1    .

.

.

.

1

40

Third Leyte (CVA-32), former CV-32 & Crown Point

1

.

.

.

.

.

41

Philippine Sea (AVT-11), former CVS-47, CVA-47 & CV-47

1

.

.

.

.

1

42

Arlington (AGMR-2), former Saipan, AGMR-2, CC-3, AVT-6 & CVL-48

2

.

.

1

.

1

43

Valley Forge (LPH-8), former CVS-45, CVA-45 & CV-45

3

.

.

1

1

2

44

Second Wright (CC-2), former AVT-7 & CVL-49

2

.

.

.

.

1

45

Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42

.

1

.

1

1

1

46

Oriskany (CV-34) former CVA-34 & CV-34

.

1.

.

.

.

1

47

Forrestal (AVT-59), former CV-59 & CVA-59

.

2

.

4

.

.

48

Saratoga (CV-60), former CVA-60 & CVB-60

.

.

.

10

.

.

49

Seventh Ranger (CV-61) former CVA-61

.

1

.

.

.

1

50

Fifth Independence (CV-62), former CVA-62

.

2

1

5

.

2

San Diego, Ca. to Japan to San Diego, Ca.

51

Second Kitty Hawk (CV-63), former CVA-63

.

1

.

1

1

2

San Diego, Ca. to Japan to San Diego, Ca.

52

Third Constellation (CV-64), former CVA-64

.

3

.

.

1

2

53

Eighth Enterprise (CVN-65), former CVA(N)-65

.

3

4

19

.

-

54

America (CV-66), former CVA-66

.

2

4

16

.

.

55

John F. Kennedy (CV-67), former CVA-67

.

.

.

14

.

.

56

Nimitz (CVN-68), former CVA(N)-68

.

2

3

.

1

2

57

Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), former CVA(N)-69

.

.

2

20

.

.

58

Carl Vinson (CVN)-70)

.

1

1

1

1

2

59

Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71)

.

.

1

13

.

.

60

Second Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72)

.

1

./

1

.

1

61

Third George Washington (CVN-73)

.

2

.

14

1

2

San Diego, Ca. to Japan to San Diego, Ca.

62

John C. Stennis (CVN-74)

.

.

.

1

.

1

63

Harry S. Truman (CVN-75)

.

.

.

12

.

.

64

Ronald Reagan (CVN-76)

.

1

.

.

.

2

San Diego, Ca. to Japan to San Diego, Ca.

65

George H. W. Bush (CVN-77)

.

.

.

4

.

.

66

Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

68

43

21

148

19

58

Reporting to the Pacific via Panama Canal or Cape Horn in the fall of 1943, via Panama Canal or Cape Horn, Bunker Hill participated in carrier operations during the Rabaul strike (11 November 1943); Gilbert Islands operation and supported the landings on Tarawa (13 November-8 December).

Princeton, with Air Group 23 embarked, got underway for the Pacific. Arriving at Pearl Harbor 9 August 1943, via Panama Canal or Cape Horn.

After a brief shakedown cruise Belleau Wood reported to the Pacific Fleet, via Panama Canal or Cape Horn, arriving at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 26 July 1943.

Once commissioned Langley went to the Pacific late in the year of 1943 via Panama Canal or Cape Horn and entered combat in World War II. After shakedown in the Caribbean, Langley departed Philadelphia 6 December 1943 for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, where she participated in training operations. While at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Langley received word that hostilities had ended. Langley completed two "Magic Carpet" voyages to the Pacific, transporting Pacific veterans home and got underway 1 October 1945 for Philadelphia via Panama Canal or Cape Horn. Langley departed from Philadelphia 15 November 1945 for the first of two trips in the Atlantic Ocean to Europe, transporting Army troops returning home from that theater in November 1945 to 6 January 1946. Langley returned to Philadelphia 6 January 1946 and was assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia Group, 31 May. She decommissioned 11 February 1947, and was transferred to France under the Mutual Defense Assistance Program, 8 January 1951. In French service she was renamed Lafayette (R-96). The carrier was returned to the United States 20 March 1963 and sold to the Boston Metals Co., Baltimore, Md., for scrapping.

Shortly after commissioning, and, after shakedown, Monterey departed Philadelphia for the western Pacific, via Panama Canal or Cape Horn, reaching the Gilberts 19 November 1943, in time to help secure Makin Island. Monterey departed Japanese waters 7 September 1945, having embarked troops at Tokyo, and steamed home, via Panama Canal or Cape Horn, arriving New York City 17 October 1945.

Cabot sailed from Quonset Point, R.I., 8 November 1943 for Pearl Harbor, via Cape Horn, arriving on 2 December 1943. Embarking homeward-bound men at Guam, Cabot arrived at San Diego, Calif. 9 November 1945, then sailed for the east coast, via the Panama Canal or Cape Horn, Cabot was placed out of commission in reserve at Philadelphia 11 February 1947.

Bennington transited the Panama Canal en route for San Diego, Calif. on 21 November 1944. Bennington arrived at San Francisco, Calif. 7 November 1945. In early March 1946, Bennington transited the Panama Canal en route to Norfolk, Virginia.

After training in the Caribbean, USS Intrepid (CV-11) departed Norfolk 3 December 1943 for San Francisco, then to Hawaii. Intrepid arrived San Pedro, California, 15 December 1945. Intrepid (CVS-11) with CVSG-56 embarked, departed Hampton Roads 23 January 1963, on her second Western Atlantic deployment and third Caribbean Sea voyage via the Panama Canal or Cape Horn, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, to participate in warfare exercises. She will under go her first deployment as a ASW carrier, completing overhaul and modifications to ASW carrier at New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York 10 March 1962, redesignated CVS-11 on 31 March 1962, reclassified to an antisubmarine warfare carrier, on 8 December 1961. On 23 March 1963, Intrepid with CVSG-56 embarked, arrived Norfolk, Virginia. In June of 1967, Intrepid returned to the western Pacific, by way of the Suez Canal just prior to its closing during the Arab-Israeli crisis. In mid-1970, Intrepid was homeported at Quonset Point, R.I., relieving USS Yorktown (CVS 10) as the flagship for Commander Carrier Division Sixteen. Intrepid was decommissioned for the final time 15 Mar 1974.

After shakedown in the Caribbean, Langley departed Philadelphia 6 December 1943 for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, where she participated in training operations, via the Panama Canal or Cape Horn. The carrier was returned to the United States 20 March 1963 and sold to the Boston Metals Co., Baltimore, Md., for scrapping, via the Panama Canal or Cape Horn.

After shakedown in the Caribbean, San Jacinto sailed, via the Panama Canal, San Diego, and Pearl Harbor, for the Pacific war zone.

Bataan initial engagement with the Japanese, Bataan's planes supported the attack on Hollandia, New Guinea, between 21 and 24 April 1944, either via the Panama Canal or Cape Horn.

Franklin cruised to Trinidad in the Caribbean Sea for shakedown and soon thereafter departed in TG 27.7 for San Diego to engage in intensive training exercises preliminary to combat duty either via the Panama Canal or Cape Horn. Franklin was taken in tow by USS Pittsburgh (CA-2) until she managed to churn up speed to 14 knots and proceed to Pearl Harbor where a cleanup job permitted her to sail under her own power to Brooklyn, N.Y., via the Panama Canal or Cape Horn, arriving on 28 April.

USS Hancock departed Boston 31 July 1944 en route to Pearl Harbor via the Panama Canal and San Diego, Ca.

USS Ticonderoga transited Panama Canal on 4 September 1944 and steamed up the coast to San Diego, Calif. the following day) became part of the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) and 6th Fleet operating in the Mediterranean Sea as an operational carrier in January 1955. In January 1955, Ticonderoga shifted to her new homeport of Norfolk, Virginia where she arrived on the 6th via Panama Canal or Cape Horn. Over the next month, she conducted carrier qualifications with Air Group 6 in the Virginia Capes operating area. Ticonderoga remained at Norfolk for almost two months outfitting and embarking Air Group 89, shaping a course for the British West Indies on 26 June 1944.

Bennington transited the Panama Canal en route for San Diego, Calif. on 21 November 1944.

Shangri-la stood out of Hampton Roads 17 January 1945, formed up with USS Guam (CB-2) and USS Harry E. Hubbard (DD-748), steaming to San Diego, California on her second voyage in foreign waters steaming south through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea, on her first Panama Canal transit and second voyage in the Caribbean departing Norfolk, Va. in January 1945. She arrived in Mayport on 16 December and began preparations for inactivation, via the Panama Canal or Cape Horn.

Following shakedown cruise off Trinidad, operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet, Randolph got underway for the Panama Canal and the Pacific, operating with the Pacific Fleet Command. Following the end of the war, Randolph headed home. Transiting the Panama Canal in late September, she arrived at Norfolk, 15 October, where she was rigged for the "Magic Carpet" service.

Departed Norfolk, Va. 19 March 1945 to join the Pacific Fleet, via the Panama Canal or Cape Horn, arriving at Pearl Harbor 5 April 1945 where she conducted training in Hawaiian waters before joining TF 38 off Okinawa 6 June 1945. Bon Homme Richard received one battle star for her World War II service and five battle stars for participation in the Korean conflict. Bon Homme Richard was recommissioned 15 January 1951 and on 10 May departed San Diego for the Far East. She joined TF 77 off Korea on 29 May and launched her first air strikes 31 May. Bon Homme Richard continued operations with TF 77 until 20 November 1951. The carrier reached San Diego in mid-December.

After a three-day stop at Norfolk, Va., USS Antietam (CV-36) resumed her voyage to the Panama Canal in company with USS Higbee (DD-806), USS George W. Ingram (APD-43), and USS Ira Jeffery (APD-44). Antietam arrived at Cristóbal on 31 May 1945, and transited the Panama Canal the next day, continuing her voyage up the coast to San Diego Calif.

Panama Canal or Cape Horn transits counted as via Panama Canal.

Early in March, Wasp departed Boston and sailed south through the southern Atlantic and Caribbean Sea via the Panama Canal to San Diego, California. Wasp returned to Boston for Navy Day, 27 October 1945 via Panama Canal or Cape Horn. On 30 October 1945, Wasp got underway for the Naval shipyard in New York for a period of availability to have additional facilities installed for maximum transportation of troops. Work was completed at Naval Shipyard in New York on 15 November 1945 that enabled Wasp to accommodate some 5,500 enlisted passengers and 400 officers.   After receiving the new alterations, Wasp was assigned temporary duty as an Operation Magic Carpet troop transport. After receiving the new alterations, Wasp was assigned temporary duty as an Operation Magic Carpet troop transport. On 17 February 1947, Wasp was placed out of commission in reserve, attached to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. In the summer of 1948, Wasp was taken out of the reserve fleet and placed in the New York Naval Shipyard for refitting and alterations to enable her to accommodate the larger, heavier, and faster planes of the jet age. Upon the completion of this conversion, the ship was recommissioned on 10 September 1951. Wasp reported to the Atlantic Fleet in November 1951 and began a period of shakedown training which lasted until February 1952.