U.S. Marine Squadrons

Part 6 of 6 VMMT VMAT VMFAT VMGR VMR HMA / VMO VMU

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

 

 

A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operation Evening Light and Eagle Claw - 24 April 1980

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 1980)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Marine Squadrons

Part 1 of 6 HMX HMT MALS

Part 2 of 6 HMM

Part 3 of 6 HMH

Part 4 of 6 HMR HML HMLA HMLAT HMMT

Part 5 of 6 VMM HX / MX / VMX

Part 6 of 6 VMMT VMAT VMFAT VMGR VMR HMA / VMO VMU

 

 

Marine Medium Tiltrotor Training Squadron

 

The squadron provides new and conversion training to both Marine and Air Force pilots and units in the use and maintenance of the Osprey tiltrotor aircraft that is scheduled to replace the Marine Corps' fleet of CH-46 Sea Knights (Ref. [63] of List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons Wikipedia & Navy web site).

 

VMMT-204 / VMMT 204

VMMT-204

204v.gif

Raptors

"White Knights"

Tail code: GX 1972-

Aircraft: CH-46A/D/F/E; CH-53A/D; MV-22

2nd MAW

MCAS New River, NC

Comm. 1 May 1972

Present

Marine Medium Tiltrotor Training Squadron 204 (VMMT-204) is the MV-22 Osprey training squadron of the United States Marine Corps. Known as the "Raptors", the squadron was originally designated Marine Medium Helicopter Training Squadron 204 (HMT-204) to train new CH-46E pilots and was officially redesignated as VMMT-204 on June 10, 1999. They fall under the command of Marine Aircraft Group 26 (MAG-26) and the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing (2nd MAW).

 

Activated 1 May 1972 at New River, NC, as Marine Helicopter Training Squadron 204. The history of VMMT-204 goes back to 1972 when Marine Helicopter Training Group 40 was deactivated. The personnel and assets of the deactivated squadrons (HMHT-401 and HMMT-402) were combined to create a new squadron HMT-204. From 1972 to 1999, HMT-204 trained crews and maintenance personnel for the CH-46 and CH-53. In 1999, the squadron became the model manager for the MV-22 "Osprey" tilt-rotor aircraft. The change of aircraft meant a change in designation and so HMT-204 was redesignated 1 June 1999 as Marine Tilt-Rotor Training Squadron 204 (Ref. http://hma1369.tripod.com/204.html ).

 

Awards

 MERITORIOUS UNIT COMMENDATION

NATIONAL DEFENSE SERVICE STREAMER with 1 bronze star

HMT-204 VMMT-204

 

204old.gif 204v.gif

References include List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons at Wikipedia; others and navy web sites all linked herto.

 

Marine Attack Training Squadron

 

VMFT-401 is the only aggressor squadron in the Marine Corps. It flies the F-5E Tiger II and provides instruction to active and reserve squadrons through dissimilar adversary combat tactics. The squadron is based at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona (Ref. [102] of List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons Wikipedia & Navy web site).

 

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VMAT-203 / VMAT-203

VMFT-401 / VMFT-401

 

VMAT-203

Vmat203.jpg

Hawks

MAG-14, 2nd MAW

MCAS Cherry Point, NC

Comm. 1 July 1947

Present

VMFT-401

VMFT-401.gif

Snipers

MAG-41, 4th MAW

MCAS Yuma, AZ

Comm. 18 Mar. 1986

Present

 

Marine Attack Training Squadron 203 (VMAT-203) is a squadron in the United States Marine Corps that trains naval aviators to fly the AV-8B Harrier. Also known as the Hawks, the squadron is based at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point and falls under the command of Marine Aircraft Group 14 and the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing. Their radio callsign is "Mars".

Marine Fighter Training Squadron 401 (VMFT-401) is a United States Marine Corps Reserve fighter squadron flying the F-5N Tiger II. Known as the "Snipers", the squadron is the only adversary squadron in the Marine Corps. They are based at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma and fall under the command of the 4th Marine Aircraft Wing and Marine Aircraft Group 41. VMFT-401 is a non-deployable unit.

References include List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons at Wikipedia; others and navy web sites all linked herto.

 

Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron

 

VMFAT-101 trains newly commissioned Naval Aviators to fly the F/A-18 Hornet while VMFAT-501 will eventually train new pilots to fly the F-35B Lightning II (Ref. [100] & [101] of List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons Wikipedia & Navy web site).

 

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VMFAT-101 / VMFAT-101

VMFAT-501 / VMFAT-501

 

VMFAT-101

VMFAT-101 insignia.png

Sharpshooters

January 3, 1969

MAG-11, 3rd MAW

MCAS Miramar, CA

Comm. 3 Jan. 1969 Present

VMFAT-501

VMFAT 501.PNG

Warlords

MAG-31, 2nd MAW

Eglin AFB, FL

Comm. 1 Apr. 2010 Present

 

Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 101 (VMFAT-101) is a United States Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornet training squadron. The squadron is based at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California and falls under the command of Marine Aircraft Group 11 (MAG-11) and the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (3rd MAW).

Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 501 (VMFAT-501) is a newly reactivated training squadron in the United States Marine Corps that will eventually consist of 20 F-35B Lightning II aircraft and will serve as the Fleet Replacement Squadron. Known as the "Warlords," the squadron will be based at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida and will fall administratively under Marine Aircraft Group 31 and the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, but operationally under the U.S. Air Force's 33d Fighter Wing. The squadron has assumed the lineage of VMFA-451 which was originally known as the Blue Devils and saw action during World War II and Operation Desert Storm. They were decommissioned on January 31, 1997.

References include List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons at Wikipedia; others and navy web sites all linked hereto.

 

Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadrons

 

VMGR squadrons operate the KC-130 Hercules tanker/transport. Their primary missions are aerial and rapid ground refuelling, transportation of personnel and cargo to include MEDEVACs and parachute insertions, flying the airborne version of the Direct Air Support Center (DASC) and emergency resupply into unimproved landing zones (Ref. [103]; [104] & [105] of List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons Wikipedia & Navy web site).

 

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VMGR-152 / VMGR-152

VMGR-234 / VMGR-234

VMGR-252 / VMGR-252

VMGR-152

VMGR-152patchscan.jpg

Sumos

MAG-36, 1st MAW

MCAS Futenma, Japan

Comm. 11 Mar. 1942

Present

VMGR-234

VMGR-234.png

Rangers

MAG-41, 4th MAW

NASJRB Fort Worth, TX

Comm. 1 May 1942

Present

VMGR-252

Vmgr252 insig.jpg

Otis

MAG-14, 2nd MAW

MCAS Cherry Point, NC

Comm. 1 June 1928

Present

VMGR-352 / VMGR-352

VMGR-452 / VMGR-452

 

VMGR-352

VMGR-352 squadron insignia.png

Raiders

MAG-11, 3rd MAW

MCAS Miramar, CA

Comm. 1 Apr. 1943

Present

VMGR-452

Vmgr452 insig.jpg

Yankees

MAG-49, 4th MAW

Stewart ANGB, NY

Comm. 9 Sep. 1988

Present

 

Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 152 (VMGR-152) provides aerial refueling service to support Fleet Marine Force (FMF) air operations; and provides assault air transport of personnel, equipment, and supplies. The squadron, known as the "Sumos", flies the fixed-wing KC-130J aircraft. VMGR-152 is stationed at Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa, Japan and is part of Marine Aircraft Group 36 (MAG-36) and the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing (1st MAW).

Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 234 (VMGR-234) is a reserve United States Marine Corps KC-130T squadron. They are a part of Marine Aircraft Group 41 (MAG-41), 4th Marine Aircraft Wing (4th MAW) and provide both fixed-wing and rotary-wing aerial refueling capabilities to support Marine Forces Reserve air operations in addition to assault air transport of personnel, equipment, and supplies. The squadron, known as the "Rangers" is stationed at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth, Texas.

Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 252 (VMGR-252) is a United States Marine Corps KC-130J squadron. They are a part of Marine Aircraft Group 14 (MAG-14), 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing (2nd MAW) and provide both fixed-wing and rotary-wing aerial refueling capabilities to support Fleet Marine Force air operations in addition to assault air transport of personnel, equipment, and supplies. The squadron, known as "Otis" is stationed at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina. It also has the distinction of being the oldest continually active squadron in the Marine Corps (Ref. VMGR-252 Continues Long Illustrious History of Flying).

Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 352 (VMGR-352) is a United States Marine Corps KC-130J squadron. They are a part of Marine Aircraft Group 11 (MAG-11), 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (3rd MAW) and provide both fixed-wing and rotary-wing aerial refueling capabilities to support Fleet Marine Force (FMF) air operations in addition to assault air transport of personnel, equipment, and supplies. The squadron, known as the "Raiders" is stationed at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California.

Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 452 (VMGR-452) is a reserve United States Marine Corps KC-130T squadron. They fall under the command of Marine Aircraft Group 49 (MAG-49) and the 4th Marine Aircraft Wing (4th MAW). The squadron, known as the "Yankees", is stationed at Stewart Air National Guard Base, New York.

References include List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons at Wikipedia; others and navy web sites all linked hereto.

 

Marine Transport Squadron

 

VMR squadrons provide search and rescue support as well as movement of key personnel and critical logistics support around the world. They also provide movement of high priority passengers and cargo during wartime in support of operations and other critical commitments.[111]

 

The squadron trains newly commissioned Naval Aviators to fly the AV-8B Harrier II (Ref. 111 & [75] of List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons Wikipedia & Navy web site).

 

VMR-1 / VMR-1

VMR-1

VMR-1Insignia.gif

Roadrunners

H&HS, MCAS Cherry Point

MCAS Cherry Point, NC

Comm. Jan. 1943

1988 Present

Marine Transport Squadron 1 is a light transport aircraft squadron of the United States Marine Corps. Also known as the "Roadrunners", the squadron is based at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point and falls under Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron (H&HS). In addition to its military search and rescue duties, VMR-1 also serves the local community with its medical evacuation and search and rescue capabilities.

 

Marine Observation Squadrons

 

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VMO-1 / VMO-1

Vmo1 insig.jpg

OY-1,2 "Grasshopper"; AE-1 "Cub"; OE-1/O-1B,OE-2/O-1C "Bird Dog"; HO5S; HOK/OH-43D; UH-1E,N; AH-1J; OV-10A/D/D+

Comm. 27 July 1943

Deactivated 31 July 1993

VMO-2 / VMO-2

Vmo2b insig.jpg

Cherry Deuce

OY-1 "Grasshopper"; SNB-5/C-45J; HOK-1/OH-43D; OE-1,2/O-1B,C; UH-1E; OV-10A,D,D+

Comm. 1 Nov. 1943

Deactivated 23 May 1993 at Camp Pendleton

VMO-351/VMO-3

vmo3a.gif

Scarface

OY-1 (WW2); AE-1*; SBD-5**; UH-1E

Images for VMO-3

1 Dec. 1943 20 Aug. 1949

August 1, 1966 Present as HMLA-367

 

 

 

 

VMO-4 / VMO-4

vmo4.gif (7K)

 

OY-1 (WW2); UH-34D; OV-10A/D

Activated 20 Dec. 1943 at Quantico, Virginia, as (Artillery Spotting Division) Marine Observation Squadron 951 ((ASD) VMO-951).

Deactivated 21 Oct. 1945 at San Diego, California.

VMO-5 / VMO-5

vmo5 (4K)

 

Black Aces, "Stingers"

OY-1; GH-1 (WW2); UH-1E; OV-10A

Activated 15 February 1944 at Quantico, VA, as Marine Observation Squadron 5.

Redesignated 15 March 1968 as Marine Light Helicopter Squadron 267. Redesignated HMLA-267 in 1987

February 15, 1944 - January 31, 1946
December 15, 1966 - present

VMO-6 / VMO-6

Vmo6 insig.jpg

 

Hell-Divers (VO-6M); "Tomcats"; "Cherry Six"

OY-1; OE-1/O-1C; HTL; HO3S; HO5S; HOK-1/OH-43D; T-28C;

UH-1E; OV-10A

Activated 1 December 1920 at Marine Barracks, Quantico, Virginia, as Flight E, 3d Air Squadron.

Comm. 1 Dec. 1920 30 June 1933

Activated 20 Nov. 1944 1 Jan. 1977 (Many deactivations)

VMO-1 began life as a fixed-wing squadron in World War 2, earning battle stars for service at Guam and Iwo Jima. After the war, VMO-1 was based at Cherry Point, and then New River. In 1952, the squadron received its first helicopters, Kaman HOK-1s. From this date, until 1971, the squadron would operate both fixed-wing and helos together. During this period, VMO-1 was the first squadron to operate the HO5S, HOK, UH-1E, UH-1N, and the AH-1J. During the Korean War, VMO-1 trained personnel headed for combat, as well as supporting the 2d Marine Division at home.

In March 1964, VMO-1 became the first USMC squadron to operate the turbine-powered UH-1E "Huey". Later that month two VMO-1 Hueys rescued a party of road engineers from hostile Indians in Peru. In 1965, VMO-1 supported the US intervention in the Dominican Republic. Later that year, the squadron transferred out all of its O-1C "Birdogs", and became an all-helicopter squadron.

 

In July 1968, VMO-1 began operating the OV-10A "Bronco". VMO-1 transferred all its helicopters in February 1971 and became a fixed-wing squadron again. During the late 1970s, the squadron began rotating detachments with VMO-2 to Okinawa to support Marines in the Far East. In 1980 the first OV-10D arrived, giving the squadron increased reconaissance capabilities. Throughout the 1980s VMO-1 continued to support exercises in the Caribbean, Northern Europe, and the Mediterranean. VMO-1 was awarded a Navy Unit Commendation during this period for supporting drug interdiction missions.

 

In December 1990, VMO-1 embarked its OV-10s aboard USS America and USS Theodore Roosevelt to deploy to Kuwait in support of Operation Desert Shield/Storm. The squadron flew over 1000 combat sorties, losing one crew to enemy action (1 KIA, 1 POW). VMO-1 was deactivated 28 July 1993 (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://hma1369.tripod.com/vmo1.html).

 

Marine Observation Squadron 1 (VMO-1) was an observation squadron of the United States Marine Corps which saw extensive action during World War II and supported numerous contingencies during the Cold War. They were based at Marine Corps Air Station New River, North Carolina and saw their final deployment in support of Operation Desert Storm in 1991. They were deactivated on July 31, 1993 (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VMO-1).

 

(ASD)VMO-155

 

vmo1_remake (5K) vmo1a.gifvmo1 (5K)

WW 2 1950s-60s OV-10s

VMO-2 was activated at Quantico, Virginia on 1 November 1943, with the designation (Artillery Spotting Division) VMO-251. After an initial training period with their OY "Grasshopper" aircraft, VMO-251 departed for San Diego, where it carried out more training. In January 1944 the squadron was redesignated VMO-2, and in February, moved to Hawaii. In Hawaii, VMO-2 trained with the 2d Marine Division. VMO-2 deployed to Saipan in June, flying in support of 2d Marine Division operations there, and at Tinian. During March and April 1945, VMO-2 flew spotting missions on Okinawa before being ordered back to Saipan. From September 1945 to January 1946, VMO-2 was attached to Marine Observation Group 1, and performed occupation duties in Japan. The squadron then relocated to Cherry Point*, and deactivated 26 August 1946.

 

VMO-2 was reactivated at Santa Ana, California, on 15 June 1951. Besides the OY-2 and OE-1 fixed-wing aircraft, the squadron also operated a mixture of light helicopters, including the HOK/OH-43D, HO5S-1, and HTL-4/5. In July 1953, VMO-2 deloyed to Camp Gifu, Japan. Three years later the squadron moved to Camp Sukiran, Okinawa. In October 1960 VMO-2 moved to new quarters at Futenma, Okinawa.

 

VMO-2 began operations in Vietnam with a small detachment of OE-1 (O-1B) "Birdogs" which were attached to Operation Shufly in 1962. In 1965, the entire squadron deployed to Vietnam. All its OH-43s and O-1s were left in Okinawa, and the squadron began to fly the UH-1E. In 1968, VMO-2 began operating the first OV-10A "Broncos" in Vietnam. In 1969 squadron capabilities were increased with the addition of the AH-1G "Cobra". All the squadron's helicopters were transferred out to other units in 1969, leaving only the OV-10s. VMO-2 remained in Vietnam until April 1971, when it relocated to MCALF Camp Pendleton.

 

VMO-2 was busy during the 1970s and 1980s, supporting the 1st Marine Division and 3d Marine Aircraft Wing at home, while rotating detachments to Okinawa to support MAG-36 operations there. In 1990, VMO-2 deployed to Kuwait in support of Operation Desert Shield/Storm. The squadron's OV-10As and Ds flew the entire distance From California to Kuwait. During the combat in Kuwait, VMO-2 lost one aircraft and crew (2 POW). Following its return to Camp Pendleton in 1991, the squadron began transferring all its OV-10As. In December 1992, VMO-2 finished its final Okinawa deployment. VMO-2 was deactivated 23 May 1993 at Camp Pendleton, ending nearly 50 years of service (Ref. Complete History at reference -

http://hma1369.tripod.com/vmo2.html).

 

Marine Observation Squadron 2 (VMO-2) was an observation squadron of the United States Marine Corps which saw extensive action during World War II and the Vietnam War. They were based at Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Japan and Marine Corps Air Station Camp Pendleton, California and saw their final combat in support of Operation Desert Storm in 1991. They were deactivated on 23 May 1993 (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VMO-2).

 

 

(ASD)VMO-251 vmo2_43 (5K)vmo2_1953 (9K)vmo2devil (10K)

 

No insignia VMO-2 WW 2 1953

 

vmo2devil (10K) vmo2ey (5K)vmo2early (4K)vmo2a (5K)



vmo2c (5K) OV-10 patches vmo2_3 (8K)vmo2_4 (8K)

 

"Angry Two" 1969

 

vmo2_5a (8K)vmo2_6 (9K)

Marine Observation Squadron 3 was originally activated 1 December 1943, at Quantico, Virginia, as Marine Observation Squadron 351. It was to be the "eyes" for Marine Artillery units in the Pacific. The squadron was redesignated Marine Observation Squadron 3 in 1944. The squadron flew many hazardous spotting missions at Peleliu, and later, at Okinawa, earned the Presidential Unit Citation. After the war, VMO-3 served in Northern China, before relocating, first to Guam, and later to Cherry Point, North Carolina, where the squadron was deactivated in 1949.

In 1966, the Marine Corps received permission to activate two "temporary war-time only" VMOs. VMO-3 was reactivated at Camp Pendleton in August, and was on its way to Vietnam by December. VMO-3 flew its UH-1E Hueys from Hue/Phu Bai and MCAF Marble Mountain as part of 1st Marine Aircraft Wing. In 1968, with the addition of the OV-10A "Bronco" to the VMO inventory, the decision was made to remove the UH-1 from the VMOs and create three Light Helicopter Squadrons (HMLs). Instead of deactivation, VMO-3 and its sister squadron VMO-5 (UH-1 training squadron based at Camp Pendleton) were redesignated. VMO-3 became HML-367 (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://hma1369.tripod.com/vmo3.html).

 

These were assigned to VMOs to make up a shortage of aircraft while refitting.

**According to Navy listings, VMO-3 carried 1 SBD-5 on strength from Aug 1944 through mid-Apr 45.

 

Origins during WWII

 

HMLA-367 has a long and distinguished record in the United States Marine Corps. Its historical lineage can be traced back to December 1, 1943 when it was activated at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia as Marine Observation Squadron 351 (VMO-351) which was assigned to the Artillery Spotting Division.

 

In January 1944, the squadron was re-designated as and deployed to Marine Aircraft Group 11 on the island of Espiritu Santo whereupon it took part in the campaigns on Peleliu and Okinawa. The squadron participated in the occupation of North China from October 1945 through June 1947 and was relocated in 1949 to MCAS Cherry Point, North Carolina and assigned to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing. The Squadron, having served honorably throughout the Pacific Theater, was deactivated on August 20, 1949.

As the United States increased its presence in the Republic of Vietnam, the Marine Corps reactivated VMO-3 at Marine Corps Air Station Camp Pendleton on August 1, 1966 and assigned it to Marine Aircraft Group 37. The squadron arrived in Vietnam in December 1966 and were now flying the UH-1E. VMO-3 became fully operational at Huế/Phu Bai on 16 January 1967 (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMLA-367).

 

(ASD)VMOVMO-3

 

vmo3.gif vmo3_ww2b (4K)vmo3a.gif
WW 2 Alternate version - National Geographic 1944 Vietnam

VMO-4 was activated on 20 December 1943 at Quantico, VA. It initially carried the designation (ASD)VMO-951, but this was changed to VMO-4 on 15 January 1944. The squadron began initial VMO-training at Quantico, then moved to the West Coast for advanced training prior. Further training took place in Hawaii with the 4th Marine Division, then VMO-4 deployed with the Division and participated in the assault and capture of Saipan and Tinian.

 

After refitting in Hawaii, VMO-4 sailed for Guam in January 1945 in preparation for the Iwo Jima operation. VMO-4 flew missions over Iwo Jima from 26 February to 19 March 1945, then returned to Hawaii, where it remained through the end of the war. After the war's end, VMO-4 relocated to San Diego, and deactivated on 21 October 1945. The squadron had earned a Presidential Unit Citation (Saipan/Tinian operations) and a Navy Unit Commendation (Iwo Jima), in addition to the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Streamer with two bronze stars, and the World War Two Victory Streamer.

On 1 September 1962, VMO-4 was reactivated at Grosse Ile, Michigan, as a squadron within the 4th Marine Aircraft Wing, Marine Air Reserve Training Command. The squadron was initially equipped with SH/UH-34Ds shared with the Navy Reserve squadrons at Grosse Ile, but later got it's own aircraft.

 

In 1972, the helos were replaced by OV-10A "Broncos". VMO-4 relocated to Detroit in 1973, then moved again in 1976 to Atlanta, Georgia.

 

During the first Gulf War (1990-91), VMO-4 was activated for possible deployment and attached to MAG-29, but ended up not deploying. On 1 March 1994, the last Marine Observation Squadron, VMO-4 was deactivated at Atlanta (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://hma1369.tripod.com/vmo4.html).

 

Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 4 (VMU-4) is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) squadron in the United States Marine Corps that operates the RQ-7B Shadow. It is the fourth UAV squadron in the Marine Corps and the first in the reserve component. The squadron, nicknamed the Evil Eyes, entered the force structure on July 1, 2010, when Marine Observation Squadron 4 (VMO-4) was reactivated and redesignated VMU-4.

 

The squadron inherited the history of VMO-4 which was an observation squadron that saw extensive action during World War II. They were last based at Naval Air Station Atlanta near Atlanta, Georgia and were deactivated on May 23, 1993 as part of the post-Cold War drawdown of forces. VMU-4 is a subordinate unit of Marine Air Control Group 48 and the 4th Marine Aircraft Wing (Ref. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VMU-4).

VMO-951 VMO-4

 

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WW2 1960s
via "Mule" Holmberg OV-10

VMO-5 was activated 15 February 1944 at Quantico, VA. The squadron trained for three months with their new OY "Grasshoppers" before leaving for the West Coast. Four months were spent training at Camp Pendleton, followed by another five months in Hawaii. In January 1945 VMO-5 divided into two groups and proceeded to Iwo Jima, staging through Guam and Saipan on the way. On 19 February the squadron arrived at Iwo Jima and by the 28th all its aircraft were ashore. In March, VMO-5 returned to Hawaii, where they saw the end of the war. Following a brief period of occupation duty at Sasebo, Japan, VMO-5 relocated to San Diego and was deactivated 31 January 1946.

 

On 15 December 1966, Sub Unit 1, H&MS-30, the UH-1E training unit based at Camp Pendleton, was redesignated VMO-5. During the next two years, VMO-5 continued to train new UH-1 pilots, as well as those transitioning from other types. Before deactivating, VMO-5 became the OV-10A training squadron as well. On 15 March 1968 VMO-5 was redesignated HML-267.

 

Activated 15 February 1944 at Quantico, VA, as Marine Observation Squadron 5, VMO-5, at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, Virginia on February 15, 1944 (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://hma1369.tripod.com/vmo5.html).

In August 1944 came its first deployment to Marine Corps Air Station Ewa, Hawaii under the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing to participate in the Pacific theater. The squadron saw action during the Battle of Iwo Jima, and under the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing participated in the occupation of Japan in Sasebo from September 1945 through January 1946, at which time the squadron returned to San Diego and was deactivated on January 31, 1946 (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMLA-267.

 

Deactivated 31 January 1946 at San Diego, CA. Sub Unit, Headquarters and Maintenance Squadron 30 activated at Camp Pendleton. Unit, Headquarters and Maintenance Squadron 30 redesignated 15 December 1966 as Marine Light Helicopter Squadron 267 and assigned to Marine Wing Service Group 37. Redesignated 15 March 1968 as Marine Light Helicopter Squadron 267 (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://hma1369.tripod.com/vmo5.html).

 

Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 267 (HMLA-267) is a United States Marine Corps helicopter squadron consisting of AH-1Z Viper attack helicopters and UH-1Y Huey utility helicopters. The squadron is based at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California falls under the command of Marine Aircraft Group 39 (MAG-39) and the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (3rd MAW).

 

Vietnam

 

With the looming Vietnam War, the subunit of Headquarters and Maintenance Squadron 30 (H&MS-30) at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton was redesignated as VMO-5 on December 15, 1966 becoming a full fledged training squadron. They originally fell under the command of Marine Helicopter Training Group 30 under the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing and were equipped with a complement of UH-1E "Huey"s and OV-10 "Bronco"s.[1] In March 1968, the squadron was redesignated HML-267 and remained at alert status and training replacement pilots and crew for the rest of the war. In 1971, reorganization left the squadron with only UH-1E helicopters, and by the end of 1976 only UH-1N aircraft were flown.

 

Every six months HML-267 rotated one-third of its assets to Marine Corps Air Station Futenma on Okinawa, Japan. The Hueys were joined by another aircraft in 1982 as the new AH-1J "Cobra"s were deployed. As part of the Unit Deployment Program (UDP) starting in 1983, HML-267 began a regular cycle of six months in Okinawa, 18 months on Camp Pendleton. During which the squadron participated in numerous training exercises including detachments to Korea, Guam, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Iwo Jima, and Australia. Redesignated HMLA-267 in 1987, the squadron received its first complement of AH-1 Cobra "SuperCobra"s. In 1988, the squadron split into three groups: A detachment on land in Okinawa, A detachment on a West Pac, and A detachment aboard the USS Dubuque (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMLA-267).

 

VMO-5

 

vmo5_ww2p (7K) vmo5 (4K)

WW2 1966-68

Marine Observation Squadron 6 (VMO-6) traces it history to 1 December 1920, when Flight E, 3d Air Squadron was activated at Quantico, VA. Within the next seven years the squadron underwent a series of re-designations (Division 1, VF-1M; Division 1, VO-3M; Division 1, VO-6M) as new aircraft were assigned. VO-6M was assigned to the East Coast Expeditionary Force in 1927 and deployed to Nicaragua the following year. During 1928, VO-6M carried out counter-insurgency operations against the Sandinista forces until 1 September 1928, when the squadron was administratively relocated to Quantico (Squadron designation and colors only; personnel and aircraft remained in Nicaragua).

 

From 1930 to 1933, the squadron was engaged in training new pilots and mechanics, flying support for the Marine Corps schools at Quantico, and flying daily fire patrols for the Virginia Forest Service. In 1931, a flight demonstration team, the "Helldivers", was formed, and began performing at airshows as far away as Montreal and Cleveland.

In 1933, budget cuts led to a reduction in the number of Marine Corps aviation squadrons, and on 30 June 1933, VO-6M was deactivated.

 

World War Two saw the reactivation of Marine Observation Squadron 6. The "new" squadron was assigned to support the 6th Marine Division during the upcoming Okinawa operation. VMO-6 moved to San Diego, then to Hawaii, before embarking for Okinawa. From March through July 1945, VMO-6 participated in the Okinawa operation, flying from the Yontan airstrip. This would be the squadron's base until the end of the war.

 

In October 1945, VMO-6 deployed to Northern China to provide aerial reconaissance for Marine units operating there. VMO-6 relocated to Camp Pendleton in 1947.

With the start of the Korean War in 1950, VMO-6 was assigned to the 1st Provisional Brigade. Helicopters and crews were sent out from HMX-1 and joined the squadron. Over the next five years, VMO-6 performed numerous missions including artillery spotting, reconaissance, and search and rescue. VMO-6 helicopters performed countless medevac missions.

 

VMO-6 returned to Camp Pendleton in 1955. This would be its home for the next five years. In 1962, a detachment deployed in support of the Cuban Crisis operations; it was recalled before reaching the East Coast.

 

VMO-6 went to war again, deploying to South Vietnam in August 1965. At this time the squadron was operating UH-1E "Hueys"; in 1968, O-1C "Bird Dogs" were added, along with the OV-10A "Bronco". In 1967, Capt. Stephen W. Pless and his crew extracted four soldiers, under fire, from a beach where they were about to be overrun. For their heroism, Pless's crew were awarded the Navy Cross, while Pless was awarded the Medal of Honor.

 

In 1969, VMO-6 relocated to Okinawa as part of the drawdown of troops from Vietnam. The squadron supported the 9th Marine Amphibious Brigade and 1st Marine Aircraft Wing (Rear), and took part in numerous training exercises. The squadron rotated crews to Vietnam to fly with VMO-2, and in 1972, took custody of seven AH-1J "Sea Cobras" and trained replacement pilots for HMA-369.

 

VMO-6 was deactivated 1 January, 1977. It's personnel and aircraft were assigned to H&MS-36 (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://hma1369.tripod.com/vmo6.html).

 

 Activated 1 December 1920 at Marine Barracks, Quantico, Virginia, as Flight E, 3d Air Squadron.

 Redesignated 24 August 1924 as Division 1, Fighting Squadron 1, First Aviation Group, Quantico, Virginia.

 Redesignated 1 September 1925 as Division 1, Observation Squadron 3.

 Redesignated 1 July 1927 as Division 1, Observation Squadron 6, East Coast Expeditionary Force, Quantico, Virginia.

 Departed 27 January 1928 for expeditionary duty in Nicaragua.

 Assigned to Air Squadrons, 2d Brigade for counter-insurgency operations against the Sandinista rebels, 16 February - 1 September 1928.

 Administratively transferred from Air Squadrons, 2d Brigade to East Coast Expeditionary Force, Quantico, Virginia on 1 September 1928.

 Deactivated 30 June 1933.

 Reactivated 20 November 1944 at Quantico, Virginia, as Marine Observation Squadron 6.

 Deactivated 1 January 1977 (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://hma1369.tripod.com/vmo6.html).

 

Marine Observation Squadron 6 (VMO-6) was an observation squadron of the United States Marine Corps which saw extensive action during the Battle of Okinawa in World War II and the Korean War and Vietnam War. The squadron would become the first Marine Corps helicopter squadron to participate in combat operations when they participated in the Battle of Pusan Perimeter in August 1950.[1] They were deactivated on January 1, 1977.

 

In October 1969 VMO-6 departed South Vietnam for its new home at Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa. From there they participated in exercises from such places as Cubi Point in the Philippines, Atsugi, Japan; Taegu, Korea; and the Republic of China. The squadron was deactivated on January 1, 1977 (Ref. Complete History at reference - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VMO-6).

 

VO-6M VMO-6 vmo6_ww2 (4K)vmo6_51 (4K)vmo6_korea (9K)

WW2 1951 Korean War

 

vmo6sylvester (11K) vmo6_reaper (9K)vmo6a (8K)

"Sylvester - Viet Nam "Eyes of Death"

References include List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons at Wikipedia; others and navy web sites all linked herto.

 

Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadrons

 

VMUs operate the RQ-7B Shadow unmanned aerial system (UAS) which provides Marine ground forces with reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition. They also provide artillery spotting and can assist in search and rescue operations.[112][113] Since 2004, the VMU squadrons have also been operating the Boeing ScanEagle UAS, and has longer endurance and smaller footprint, but has a lesser camera capability with no IR pointer.[114] The Navy/Marine Corps has shown interest in the MQ-8B Fire Scout Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (VTUAV),[115] which was originally developed to meet the future Tier III requirements of the Marine Corps.[116] Due to the high operational tempo of the VMU squadrons in recent years, the Marine Corps stood up VMU-3 in 2008 and VMU-4, a reserve unit, was activated in 2010 (Ref. 111 & [75] of List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons Wikipedia & Navy web site)..

 

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Public History Web Site

VMU-1 / VMU-1

VMU-2 / VMU-2

VMU-3 / VMU-3

VMU-1

VMU-1 squadron insignia.png

Watchdogs

MACG-38, 3rd MAW

MCAGCC Twentynine Palms, CA

Comm. 21 Jan. 1987 Present

VMU-2

VMU-2 new insignia.gif

Night Owls

MACG-28, 2nd MAW

MCAS Cherry Point, NC

Comm. June 1984 Present

 

VMU-3

VMU-3 logo.png

Phantoms

MACG-38, 3rd MAW

MCAGCC Twentynine Palms, CA

Comm. 12 Sep. 2008 Present

VMU-4 / VMU-4

 

 

VMU-4

Evil Eyes

MACG-48, 4th MAW

MCAS Yuma, AZ

Comm. 1 July 2010 Present

 

 

Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 1 (VMU-1) is an unmanned aerial vehicle squadron in the United States Marine Corps that operates the RQ-7 Shadow and ScanEagle. They are based out of Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California and provide aerial surveillance for the I Marine Expeditionary Force. They fall under the command of Marine Air Control Group 38 and the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing.

Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 2 (VMU-2) is an unmanned aerial vehicle squadron in the United States Marine Corps that operates the RQ-7 Shadow. They are based at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina and provide aerial surveillance for the II Marine Expeditionary Force. They fall under the command of Marine Air Control Group 28 and the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing.

Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron (VMU-3) is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) squadron in the United States Marine Corps that operates the RQ-7 Shadow that consists of approximately 200 Marines. They are based out of Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California and its primary mission is to provide aerial surveillance for the I Marine Expeditionary Force. The unit also (in conjunction with VMU-1, also based at Twentynine Palms) provides Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA) to units participating in Mojave Viper, an exercise held several times a year on the base. The squadron, nicknamed the Phantoms, was activated on September 12, 2008 and falls under the command of Marine Air Control Group 38 and the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing. VMU-3 is the third UAV unit in the Marine Corps established to provide reconnaissance and assist with deployments and training of ground units. A third of the UAV Operators from VMU-1 and VMU-2 were reassigned to VMU-3 to provide the foundation for the new squadron. In late September 2008, VMU-3 successfully flew the Shadow 200 UAV for the first time, and continues to fly missions in support of 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, I Marine Expeditionary Force, and the Tactical Training Exercise Control Group (TTECG) on a regular basis. VMU-3 was awarded the 2011 Commandant's Aviation Trophy for outstanding performance of a Marine aviation squadron.

Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 4 (VMU-4) is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) squadron in the United States Marine Corps that operates the RQ-7B Shadow. It is the fourth UAV squadron in the Marine Corps and the first in the reserve component. The squadron, nicknamed the Evil Eyes, entered the force structure on July 1, 2010, when Marine Observation Squadron 4 (VMO-4) was reactivated and redesignated VMU-4. The squadron inherited the history of VMO-4 which was an observation squadron that saw extensive action during World War II. They were last based at Naval Air Station Atlanta near Atlanta, Georgia and were deactivated on May 23, 1993 as part of the post-Cold War drawdown of forces. VMU-4 is a subordinate unit of Marine Air Control Group 48 and the 4th Marine Aircraft Wing.

References include List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons at Wikipedia; others and navy web sites all linked herto.

All information within the Navy/Marine Helicopter and Navy aircraft squadrons report was collected and internet addresses reviewed from U.S. Navy web sites in conjunction with en.wikipedia, http://www.seaforces.org/usnair/current-units.htm; http://hma1369.tripod.com and many others discovered by anyone by clicking any internet address withing this report.

List of United States Navy aircraft squadrons

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_Navy_aircraft_squadrons

List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_active_United_States_Marine_Corps_aircraft_squadrons

References include List of United States Navy aircraft squadrons at Wikipedia; others and navy web sites all linked hereto.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_Navy_aircraft_squadrons

Navy Aviation Squadron Lineages

(This includes only active squadrons as of 6 January 1998)

http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq6-1.htm

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)